Relativity: the Special and the General Theory. Einstein, A. Second edition, 1995. Authorized translation by Robert W. Lawson.
bibtex   
@Book{Einstein:1995:RSG,
  author =       "Albert Einstein",
  title =        "{Relativity}: the {Special} and the {General Theory}",
  publisher =    pub-CROWN-TRADE-PAPERBACKS,
  address =      pub-CROWN-TRADE-PAPERBACKS:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "xiii + 188",
  year =         "1995",
  ISBN =         "0-517-88441-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-517-88441-6",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 21 05:53:26 MST 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 library.ox.ac.uk:210/ADVANCE",
  note =         "Authorized translation by Robert W. Lawson.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  author-dates = "1879--1955",
  tableofcontents = "Part I. The Special Theory of Relativity \\
                 1: Physical Meaning of Geometrical Propositions \\
                 2: The System of Co-ordinates \\
                 3: Space and Time in Classical Mechanics \\
                 4: The Galileian System of Co-ordinates \\
                 5: The Principle of Relativity (in the Restricted
                 Sense) \\
                 6: The Theorem of the Addition of Velocities Employed
                 in Classical Mechanics \\
                 7: The Apparent Incompatibility of the Law of
                 Propagation of Light with the Principle of Relativity
                 \\
                 8: On the Idea of Time in Physics \\
                 9: The Relativity of Simultaneity \\
                 10: On the Relativity of the Conception of Distance \\
                 11: The Lorentz Transformation \\
                 12: The Behaviour of Measuring-Rods and Clocks in
                 Motion \\
                 13: Theorem of the Addition of the Velocities. The
                 Experiment of Fizeau \\
                 14: The Heuristic Value of the Theory of Relativity \\
                 15: General Results of the Theory \\
                 16: Experience and the Special Theory of Relativity \\
                 17: Minkowski's Four-Dimensional Space \\
                 Part II. The General Theory of Relativity \\
                 18: Special and General Principle of Relativity \\
                 19: The Gravitational Field \\
                 20: The Equality of Inertial and Gravitational Mass as
                 an Argument for the General Postulate of Relativity \\
                 21: In What Respects Are the Foundations of Classical
                 Mechanics and of the Special Theory of Relativity
                 Unsatisfactory? \\
                 22: A Few Inferences from the General Principle of
                 Relativity \\
                 23: Behaviour of Clocks and Measuring-Rods on a
                 Rotating Body of Reference \\
                 24: Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Continuum \\
                 25: Gaussian Co-ordinates \\
                 26: The Space--Time Continuum of the Special Theory of
                 Relativity Considered as a Euclidean Continuum \\
                 27: The Space--Time Continuum of the General Theory of
                 Relativity Is Not a Euclidean Continuum \\
                 28: Exact Formulation of the General Principle of
                 Relativity \\
                 29: The Solution of the Problem of Gravitation on the
                 Basis of the General Principle of Relativity \\
                 Part III. Considerations on the Universe as a Whole \\
                 30: Cosmological Difficulties of Newton's Theory \\
                 31: The Possibility of a ``Finite'' and Yet
                 ``Unbounded'' Universe \\
                 32: The Structure of Space According to the General
                 Theory of Relativity Appendices \\
                 1: Simple Derivation of the Lorentz Transformation \\
                 2: Minkowski's Four-Dimensional Space (``World'') \\
                 3: The Experimental Confirmation of the General Theory
                 of Relativity (a). Motion of the Perihelion of Mercury
                 (b). Deflection of Light by a Gravitational Field (c).
                 Displacement of Spectral Lines towards the Red \\
                 4: The Structure of Space According to the General
                 Theory of Relativity \\
                 5: Relativity and the Problem of Space",
}

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