Polybrominated diphenyl ether trends in eggs of marine and freshwater birds from British Columbia, Canada, 1979-2002. Elliott, J. E, Wilson, L. K, & Wakeford, B. Environmental science & technology, 39(15):5584--91, August, 2005.
Polybrominated diphenyl ether trends in eggs of marine and freshwater birds from British Columbia, Canada, 1979-2002. [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Temporal, spatial, and interspecific trends in polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants were determined in eggs of marine and freshwater bird species from the province of British Columbia, Canada. Temporal trends in the Fraser River estuary, 1983-2002, were examined by analysis of eggs of great blue herons (Ardea herodias) and from the Strait of Georgia marine ecosystem, 1979-2002, in eggs of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus). Results were compared to those from eggs of the osprey (Pandion haliaetus) taken along the lower Fraser River and along the Columbia River near Castlegar, British Columbia, and of a pelagic seabird, the Leach's storm-petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa), collected at a colony on the Queen Charlotte Islands. Mean concentration of sigmaPBDE, 455 microg/kg w.w., were highest in heron eggs collected in 2002 from the Fraser estuary. Concentrations in eggs of cormorants and ospreys taken from sites of varying urban influence tended to be about half that value. Leach's storm petrel eggs had only trace amounts of sigmaPBDE (3.38 microg/kg), despite having similar concentrations of PCBs and organochlorine pesticides to the other species. PBDEs increased exponentially with a doubling time of 5.7 years in eggs of both herons and cormorants. Over this period of increasing PBDEs, major chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as PCBs and DDE, were stable or decreased. The PBDE pattern was relatively consistent in most years and sites, with BDEs 47 \textbackslashtextgreater 100 \textbackslashtextgreater 99 \textbackslashtextgreater 153 \textbackslashtextgreater 154 \textbackslashtextgreater 28 \textbackslashtextgreater 183. This was interpreted as evidence of technical pentaBDE formulations as primary sources of the contamination, with the octaBDE formulations as secondary. Higher resolution analysis of a subsample of the eggs revealed the presence of up to nine other congeners, including BDE209 (range: 0.9-1.8 microg/kg), indicating exposure and uptake of decaBDE sourced congeners in North American foodchains. At some locations, concentrations of pentabrominated congeners and mixtures in fish are approaching levels potentially toxic to fish-eating birds, based on rodent studies and calculations of dietary intake from fish data.
@article{elliott_polybrominated_2005,
	title = {Polybrominated diphenyl ether trends in eggs of marine and freshwater birds from {British} {Columbia}, {Canada}, 1979-2002.},
	volume = {39},
	issn = {0013-936X},
	url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16124290},
	abstract = {Temporal, spatial, and interspecific trends in polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants were determined in eggs of marine and freshwater bird species from the province of British Columbia, Canada. Temporal trends in the Fraser River estuary, 1983-2002, were examined by analysis of eggs of great blue herons (Ardea herodias) and from the Strait of Georgia marine ecosystem, 1979-2002, in eggs of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus). Results were compared to those from eggs of the osprey (Pandion haliaetus) taken along the lower Fraser River and along the Columbia River near Castlegar, British Columbia, and of a pelagic seabird, the Leach's storm-petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa), collected at a colony on the Queen Charlotte Islands. Mean concentration of sigmaPBDE, 455 microg/kg w.w., were highest in heron eggs collected in 2002 from the Fraser estuary. Concentrations in eggs of cormorants and ospreys taken from sites of varying urban influence tended to be about half that value. Leach's storm petrel eggs had only trace amounts of sigmaPBDE (3.38 microg/kg), despite having similar concentrations of PCBs and organochlorine pesticides to the other species. PBDEs increased exponentially with a doubling time of 5.7 years in eggs of both herons and cormorants. Over this period of increasing PBDEs, major chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as PCBs and DDE, were stable or decreased. The PBDE pattern was relatively consistent in most years and sites, with BDEs 47 {\textbackslash}textgreater 100 {\textbackslash}textgreater 99 {\textbackslash}textgreater 153 {\textbackslash}textgreater 154 {\textbackslash}textgreater 28 {\textbackslash}textgreater 183. This was interpreted as evidence of technical pentaBDE formulations as primary sources of the contamination, with the octaBDE formulations as secondary. Higher resolution analysis of a subsample of the eggs revealed the presence of up to nine other congeners, including BDE209 (range: 0.9-1.8 microg/kg), indicating exposure and uptake of decaBDE sourced congeners in North American foodchains. At some locations, concentrations of pentabrominated congeners and mixtures in fish are approaching levels potentially toxic to fish-eating birds, based on rodent studies and calculations of dietary intake from fish data.},
	number = {15},
	journal = {Environmental science \& technology},
	author = {Elliott, John E and Wilson, Laurie K and Wakeford, Bryan},
	month = aug,
	year = {2005},
	pmid = {16124290},
	keywords = {Animals, Birds, British Columbia, Brominated, Brominated: analysis, Environmental Monitoring, Environmental Monitoring: methods, Environmental Pollutants, Environmental Pollutants: analysis, Flame Retardants: analysis, Flame retardants, Food Chain, Fresh Water, Hydrocarbons, Ovum, Ovum: chemistry, Phenyl Ethers, Phenyl Ethers: analysis, ffr, waa},
	pages = {5584--91}
}
Downloads: 0