Evaluation of tomosynthesis elastography in a breast-mimicking phantom. Engelken, Jan, F., Sack, I., Klatt, D., Fischer, T., Fallenberg, Maria, E., Bick, U., & Diekmann, F. Eur J Radiol, 81(9):2169--2173, Sep, 2012.
Evaluation of tomosynthesis elastography in a breast-mimicking phantom. [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
To evaluate whether measurement of strain under static compression in tomosynthesis of a breast-mimicking phantom can be used to distinguish tumor-simulating lesions of different elasticities and to compare the results to values predicted by rheometric analysis as well as results of ultrasound elastography.We prepared three soft breast-mimicking phantoms containing simulated tumors of different elasticities. The phantoms were imaged using a wide angle tomosynthesis system with increasing compression settings ranging from 0 N to 105 N in steps of 15 N. Strain of the inclusions was measured in two planes using a commercially available mammography workstation. The elasticity of the phantom matrix and inclusion material was determined by rheometric analysis. Ultrasound elastography of the inclusions was performed using two different ultrasound elastography algorithms.Strain at maximal compression was 24.4%/24.5% in plane 1/plane 2, respectively, for the soft inclusion, 19.6%/16.9% for the intermediate inclusion, and 6.0%/10.2% for the firm inclusion. The strain ratios predicted by rheometrical testing were 0.41, 0.83 and 1.26 for the soft, intermediate, and firm inclusions, respectively. The strain ratios obtained for the soft, intermediate, and firm inclusions were 0.72�0.13, 1.02�0.21 and 2.67�1.70, respectively for tomosynthesis elastography, 0.91, 1.64 and 2.07, respectively, for ultrasound tissue strain imaging, and 0.97, 2.06 and 2.37, respectively, for ultrasound real-time elastography.Differentiation of tumor-simulating inclusions by elasticity in a breast mimicking phantom may be possible by measuring strain in tomosynthesis. This method may be useful for assessing elasticity of breast lesions tomosynthesis of the breast.
@article{ Engelken2012,
  author = {Engelken, Florian Jan and Sack, Ingolf and Klatt, Dieter and Fischer,
	Thomas and Fallenberg, Eva Maria and Bick, Ulrich and Diekmann, Felix},
  title = {Evaluation of tomosynthesis elastography in a breast-mimicking phantom.},
  journal = {Eur J Radiol},
  year = {2012},
  volume = {81},
  pages = {2169--2173},
  number = {9},
  month = {Sep},
  abstract = {To evaluate whether measurement of strain under static compression
	in tomosynthesis of a breast-mimicking phantom can be used to distinguish
	tumor-simulating lesions of different elasticities and to compare
	the results to values predicted by rheometric analysis as well as
	results of ultrasound elastography.We prepared three soft breast-mimicking
	phantoms containing simulated tumors of different elasticities. The
	phantoms were imaged using a wide angle tomosynthesis system with
	increasing compression settings ranging from 0 N to 105 N in steps
	of 15 N. Strain of the inclusions was measured in two planes using
	a commercially available mammography workstation. The elasticity
	of the phantom matrix and inclusion material was determined by rheometric
	analysis. Ultrasound elastography of the inclusions was performed
	using two different ultrasound elastography algorithms.Strain at
	maximal compression was 24.4%/24.5% in plane 1/plane 2, respectively,
	for the soft inclusion, 19.6%/16.9% for the intermediate inclusion,
	and 6.0%/10.2% for the firm inclusion. The strain ratios predicted
	by rheometrical testing were 0.41, 0.83 and 1.26 for the soft, intermediate,
	and firm inclusions, respectively. The strain ratios obtained for
	the soft, intermediate, and firm inclusions were 0.72�0.13, 1.02�0.21
	and 2.67�1.70, respectively for tomosynthesis elastography, 0.91,
	1.64 and 2.07, respectively, for ultrasound tissue strain imaging,
	and 0.97, 2.06 and 2.37, respectively, for ultrasound real-time elastography.Differentiation
	of tumor-simulating inclusions by elasticity in a breast mimicking
	phantom may be possible by measuring strain in tomosynthesis. This
	method may be useful for assessing elasticity of breast lesions tomosynthesis
	of the breast.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ejrad.2011.06.033},
  institution = {Department of Radiology, Charit� Universit�tsmedizin Berlin, Charit�platz
	1, 10117 Berlin, Germany. florian.engelken@charite.de},
  keywords = {Breast Neoplasms, physiopathology/ultrasonography; Elastic Modulus;
	Elasticity Imaging Techniques, instrumentation/methods; Female; Humans;
	Phantoms, Imaging; Reproducibility of Results; Sensitivity and Specificity;
	Ultrasonography, Mammary, instrumentation/methods},
  language = {eng},
  medline-pst = {ppublish},
  owner = {Heiko},
  pii = {S0720-048X(11)00574-2},
  pmid = {21724357},
  timestamp = {2013.07.26},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejrad.2011.06.033}
}
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