Anatomical hooking location and condition of animals ca ptured with pelagic longlines: The grand banks experiments 2002-2003. Epperly, S., P., Watson, J., W., Foster, D., G., & Shah, A., K. 7, 2012.
Anatomical hooking location and condition of animals ca ptured with pelagic longlines: The grand banks experiments 2002-2003 [pdf]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Experiments were conducted on the Grand Banks of the North Atlantic\nOcean during 2002-2003 to evaluate the effect of circle hooks and\nmackerel bait on pelagic longline catches and bycatch, and compare the\ntreatments to the industry standards at the time. Circle hooks were\n18/0, and both non-offset and 10 offset were used as separate treatments\nand compared to the 9/0 J-hook control hooks with 10 degrees-30 degrees\noffset. Bait treatment was mackerel (Scomber scombrus Linnaeus, 1758),\nwhich was compared to the squid control (Illex spp.). We analyzed the\neffects of hook (one J- and two circle hooks), bait (mackerel and\nsquid), temperature, soak time, and animal length on anatomical hooking\nlocation for seven fish species and two sea turtle species. We also\nanalyzed the effects of the same variables, inclusive and exclusive of\nhooking location, on the odds of boating a dead fish. We found that hook\nwas one of the most important variables in predicting anatomical hooking\nlocation, and that soak time and hook and/or anatomical hooking location\nwere important in predicting the odds of observing a dead animal\nboatside. The importance of the other variables differed by species, and\nfor several species no models were significant for predicting hooking\nlocation or for predicting observed mortality.
@misc{
 title = {Anatomical hooking location and condition of animals ca ptured with pelagic longlines: The grand banks experiments 2002-2003},
 type = {misc},
 year = {2012},
 source = {Bulletin of Marine Science},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 pages = {513-527},
 volume = {88},
 issue = {3},
 month = {7},
 id = {524010ff-f4e3-3b45-909f-a7c70d0f60a4},
 created = {2019-09-05T19:09:31.392Z},
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 abstract = {Experiments were conducted on the Grand Banks of the North Atlantic\nOcean during 2002-2003 to evaluate the effect of circle hooks and\nmackerel bait on pelagic longline catches and bycatch, and compare the\ntreatments to the industry standards at the time. Circle hooks were\n18/0, and both non-offset and 10 offset were used as separate treatments\nand compared to the 9/0 J-hook control hooks with 10 degrees-30 degrees\noffset. Bait treatment was mackerel (Scomber scombrus Linnaeus, 1758),\nwhich was compared to the squid control (Illex spp.). We analyzed the\neffects of hook (one J- and two circle hooks), bait (mackerel and\nsquid), temperature, soak time, and animal length on anatomical hooking\nlocation for seven fish species and two sea turtle species. We also\nanalyzed the effects of the same variables, inclusive and exclusive of\nhooking location, on the odds of boating a dead fish. We found that hook\nwas one of the most important variables in predicting anatomical hooking\nlocation, and that soak time and hook and/or anatomical hooking location\nwere important in predicting the odds of observing a dead animal\nboatside. The importance of the other variables differed by species, and\nfor several species no models were significant for predicting hooking\nlocation or for predicting observed mortality.},
 bibtype = {misc},
 author = {Epperly, Sheryan P. and Watson, John W. and Foster, Daniel G. and Shah, Arvind K.}
}
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