Salinity response, distribution, and possible dispersal of a barrier-island strand glycophyte, Strophostyles Umbellata (Fabaceae). Erickson, D. & Young, D. R. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club, 1995.
Salinity response, distribution, and possible dispersal of a barrier-island strand glycophyte, Strophostyles Umbellata (Fabaceae) [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
We investigated the effects of salinity on seed germination and plant water relations within the context of dispersal in sea water for the legume, Strophostyles umbellata. This hard- seeded, trailing herb is common on coastal barrier islands of Virginia, USA. Even after 3 weeks of exposure to sea water (30 parts per thousand salinity) seed germination still approached 100%. Scarification was required for seeds to imbibe and germinate; thus non-scarified seeds did not imbibe sea water during exposure. Germination of scarified seeds occurred at salinities up to 20 parts per thousand. In contrast to seed germination, plants were more sensitive; stomatal conductance and xylem pressure potential were significantly reduced at 2 parts per thousand salinity. Soil pore water salinity was also low; 70% of the soil samples collected from a barrier island population of S. umbellata were \textless1 parts per thousand salinity. Due to seed salinity resistance, non-scarified seeds could be dispersed by ocean currents and remain germinable. Successful plant establishment will then occur if precipitation leaches the salts from the sandy island soils.
@article{erickson_salinity_1995,
	title = {Salinity response, distribution, and possible dispersal of a barrier-island strand glycophyte, {Strophostyles} {Umbellata} ({Fabaceae})},
	volume = {122},
	url = {://A1995RK72900001},
	abstract = {We investigated the effects of salinity on seed germination and plant water relations within the context of dispersal in sea water for the legume, Strophostyles umbellata. This hard- seeded, trailing herb is common on coastal barrier islands of Virginia, USA. Even after 3 weeks of exposure to sea water (30 parts per thousand salinity) seed germination still approached 100\%. Scarification was required for seeds to imbibe and germinate; thus non-scarified seeds did not imbibe sea water during exposure. Germination of scarified seeds occurred at salinities up to 20 parts per thousand. In contrast to seed germination, plants were more sensitive; stomatal conductance and xylem pressure potential were significantly reduced at 2 parts per thousand salinity. Soil pore water salinity was also low; 70\% of the soil samples collected from a barrier island population of S. umbellata were {\textless}1 parts per thousand salinity. Due to seed salinity resistance, non-scarified seeds could be dispersed by ocean currents and remain germinable. Successful plant establishment will then occur if precipitation leaches the salts from the sandy island soils.},
	number = {2},
	journal = {Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club},
	author = {Erickson, D. and Young, D. R.},
	year = {1995},
	keywords = {VCR, salinity, establishment, water relations, coastal plants, dispersal, seed germination, colonization germination ecology}
}
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