Policy learning from abroad: why it is more difficult than it seems. Ettelt, S., Mays, N., & Nolte, E. Policy & Politics, 40(4):491--504, 2012.
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This article explores the process of policy learning from abroad from a knowledge utilisation perspective, using examples of health policy making in the Department of Health in England. It argues that information about policy abroad is often heterogeneous and difficult to obtain systematically and therefore does not fit easily with notions of evidence-based policy making. While some officials interviewed for this study did regard policy examples from other countries as a substitute for evidence, especially in areas in which research evidence was insufficient, others appeared to be less confident about its validity and generalisability. Department of Health officials reported a great variability in strategies to obtain such information, with processes often constrained by pressures on time and resources. They were also highly selective in exploring policy examples from abroad, with most respondents stating that they were largely interested in generating ideas to address domestic policy problems, often relating to details of policy. The iterative process of using this information thus raises questions about the extent to which looking abroad contributed to genuine policy learning.
@article{ettelt_policy_2012,
	title = {Policy learning from abroad: why it is more difficult than it seems},
	volume = {40},
	shorttitle = {Policy learning from abroad},
	doi = {10.1332/030557312X643786},
	abstract = {This article explores the process of policy learning from abroad from a knowledge utilisation perspective, using examples of health policy making in the Department of Health in England. It argues that information about policy abroad is often heterogeneous and difficult to obtain systematically and therefore does not fit easily with notions of evidence-based policy making. While some officials interviewed for this study did regard policy examples from other countries as a substitute for evidence, especially in areas in which research evidence was insufficient, others appeared to be less confident about its validity and generalisability. Department of Health officials reported a great variability in strategies to obtain such information, with processes often constrained by pressures on time and resources. They were also highly selective in exploring policy examples from abroad, with most respondents stating that they were largely interested in generating ideas to address domestic policy problems, often relating to details of policy. The iterative process of using this information thus raises questions about the extent to which looking abroad contributed to genuine policy learning.},
	number = {4},
	journal = {Policy \& Politics},
	author = {Ettelt, Stefanie and Mays, Nicholas and Nolte, Ellen},
	year = {2012},
	keywords = {International Comparisons, Knowledge Utilisation, policy learning},
	pages = {491--504},
	file = {swproxy (1).pdf:files/37137/swproxy (1).pdf:application/pdf}
}
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