Genealogical Approach. Evans, F. In The SAGE Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods, pages 370–371. SAGE Publications, Inc..
Genealogical Approach [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
The genealogical approach confronts ideas or practices that present themselves as universal. It reveals that they actually issue from and reflect a narrower source. Once this revelation is accomplished, genealogy evaluates the more limited meaning of the practices. Ultimately, genealogy attempts to show that all practices have variable meanings and reflect different forces rather than possess intrinsic meanings and point to a permanent reality. In the social sciences and humanities, the works of the major progenitors of genealogy, Friedrich Nietzsche and Michel Foucault, have given rise to those forms of discourse analysis and ethnographic studies that emphasize the preeminent role of language and other practices in constructing or establishing the identities of the subjects and objects with which we interact. The constituting role of these practices applies also to us: we are simultaneously the vehicles and the products of our discursive and nondiscursive social practices. This entry reviews the meaning of genealogy for Nietzsche and Foucault and then discusses the presence of genealogy in the social sciences and humanities.
@incollection{evans_genealogical_2008,
	location = {2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks California 91320 United States},
	title = {Genealogical Approach},
	isbn = {978-1-4129-4163-1},
	url = {http://sk.sagepub.com/reference/research/n185.xml},
	abstract = {The genealogical approach confronts ideas or practices that present themselves as universal. It reveals that they actually issue from and reflect a narrower source. Once this revelation is accomplished, genealogy evaluates the more limited meaning of the practices. Ultimately, genealogy attempts to show that all practices have variable meanings and reflect different forces rather than possess intrinsic meanings and point to a permanent reality. In the social sciences and humanities, the works of the major progenitors of genealogy, Friedrich Nietzsche and Michel Foucault, have given rise to those forms of discourse analysis and ethnographic studies that emphasize the preeminent role of language and other practices in constructing or establishing the identities of the subjects and objects with which we interact. The constituting role of these practices applies also to us: we are simultaneously the vehicles and the products of our discursive and nondiscursive social practices. This entry reviews the meaning of genealogy for Nietzsche and Foucault and then discusses the presence of genealogy in the social sciences and humanities.},
	pages = {370--371},
	booktitle = {The {SAGE} Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods},
	publisher = {{SAGE} Publications, Inc.},
	author = {Evans, Fred},
	editor = {Given, Lisa},
	urldate = {2018-12-18},
	date = {2008},
	doi = {10.4135/9781412963909.n185}
}

Downloads: 0