'If you sound like me, you must be more human': On the interplay of robot and user features on human-robot acceptance and anthropomorphism. Eyssel, F., Kuchenbrandt, D., Bobinger, S., De Ruiter, L., & Hegel, F. In HRI'12 - Proceedings of the 7th Annual ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, 2012.
abstract   bibtex   
In an experiment we manipulated a robot's voice in two ways: First, we varied robot gender; second, we equipped the robot with a human-like or a robot-like synthesized voice. Moreover, we took into account user gender and tested effects of these factors on human-robot acceptance, psychological closeness and psychological anthropomorphism. When participants formed an impression of a same-gender robot, the robot was perceived more positively. Participants also felt more psychological closeness to the same-gender robot. Similarly, the same-gender robot was anthropomorphized more strongly, but only when it utilized a human-like voice. Results indicate that a projection mechanism could underlie these effects. © 2012 Authors.
@inProceedings{
 title = {'If you sound like me, you must be more human': On the interplay of robot and user features on human-robot acceptance and anthropomorphism},
 type = {inProceedings},
 year = {2012},
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 keywords = {[anthropomorphism, gender stereotypes, human-robot},
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 abstract = {In an experiment we manipulated a robot's voice in two ways: First, we varied robot gender; second, we equipped the robot with a human-like or a robot-like synthesized voice. Moreover, we took into account user gender and tested effects of these factors on human-robot acceptance, psychological closeness and psychological anthropomorphism. When participants formed an impression of a same-gender robot, the robot was perceived more positively. Participants also felt more psychological closeness to the same-gender robot. Similarly, the same-gender robot was anthropomorphized more strongly, but only when it utilized a human-like voice. Results indicate that a projection mechanism could underlie these effects. © 2012 Authors.},
 bibtype = {inProceedings},
 author = {Eyssel, F. and Kuchenbrandt, D. and Bobinger, S. and De Ruiter, L. and Hegel, F.},
 booktitle = {HRI'12 - Proceedings of the 7th Annual ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction}
}
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