BodyScan: Enabling Radio-based Sensing on Wearable Devices for Contactless Activity and Vital Sign Monitoring. Fang, B., Lane, N., D., Zhang, M., Boran, A., & Kawsar, F. In Proceedings of the Annual International Conference on Mobile Systems, Applications, and Services, of (MobiSys ), pages 97-110, 2016. ACM.
BodyScan: Enabling Radio-based Sensing on Wearable Devices for Contactless Activity and Vital Sign Monitoring [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Wearable devices are increasingly becoming mainstream consumer products carried by millions of consumers. However, the potential impact of these devices is currently constrained by fundamental limitations of their built-in sensors. In this paper, we introduce radio as a new powerful sensing modality for wearable devices and propose to transform radio into a mobile sensor of human activities and vital signs. We present BodyScan, a wearable system that enables radio to act as a single modality capable of providing whole-body continuous sensing of the user. BodyScan overcomes key limitations of existing wearable devices by providing a contactless and privacy-preserving approach to capturing a rich variety of human activities and vital sign information. Our prototype design of BodyScan is comprised of two components: one worn on the hip and the other worn on the wrist, and is inspired by the increasingly prevalent scenario where a user carries a smartphone while also wearing a wristband/smartwatch. This prototype can support daily usage with one single charge per day. Experimental results show that in controlled settings, BodyScan can recognize a diverse set of human activities while also estimating the user's breathing rate with high accuracy. Even in very challenging real-world settings, BodyScan can still infer activities with an average accuracy above 60% and monitor breathing rate information a reasonable amount of time during each day.
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 title = {BodyScan: Enabling Radio-based Sensing on Wearable Devices for Contactless Activity and Vital Sign Monitoring},
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 year = {2016},
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 abstract = {Wearable devices are increasingly becoming mainstream consumer products carried by millions of consumers. However, the potential impact of these devices is currently constrained by fundamental limitations of their built-in sensors. In this paper, we introduce radio as a new powerful sensing modality for wearable devices and propose to transform radio into a mobile sensor of human activities and vital signs. We present BodyScan, a wearable system that enables radio to act as a single modality capable of providing whole-body continuous sensing of the user. BodyScan overcomes key limitations of existing wearable devices by providing a contactless and privacy-preserving approach to capturing a rich variety of human activities and vital sign information. Our prototype design of BodyScan is comprised of two components: one worn on the hip and the other worn on the wrist, and is inspired by the increasingly prevalent scenario where a user carries a smartphone while also wearing a wristband/smartwatch. This prototype can support daily usage with one single charge per day. Experimental results show that in controlled settings, BodyScan can recognize a diverse set of human activities while also estimating the user's breathing rate with high accuracy. Even in very challenging real-world settings, BodyScan can still infer activities with an average accuracy above 60% and monitor breathing rate information a reasonable amount of time during each day.},
 bibtype = {inProceedings},
 author = {Fang, Biyi and Lane, Nicholas D and Zhang, Mi and Boran, Aidan and Kawsar, Fahim},
 booktitle = {Proceedings of the Annual International Conference on Mobile Systems, Applications, and Services}
}
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