Diversity and seasonal phenology of aboveground arthropods in conventional and transgenic maize crops in Central Spain. Farinós, G., P., de la Poza, M., Hernández-Crespo, P., Ortego, F., & Castañera, P. Biological Control, 44(3):362-371, 2008.
abstract   bibtex   
One of the major concerns regarding the release of Bt maize is its potential negative impact on non-target organisms present in this crop. In this paper, we compare the temporal phenology and community structure of the aboveground arthropods in commercial Bt maize fields in Central Spain with those of conventional maize crops, with or without an insecticide (imidacloprid) seed treatment, over a period of three years. Spiders, harvestmen, centipedes, ground beetles, rove beetles, carrion beetles, click beetles, earwigs and damsel bugs were captured in pitfall traps every year in sufficient number to provide meaningful phenological data. One predator spider and three omnivorous species of ground beetles have been consistently present in the maize fields: Pardosa occidentalis, Poecilus cupreus, Pseudophonus rufipes and Pseudophonus griseus, respectively. Rove beetles were caught to a lesser extent, with three dominant species: Acrotona aterrima, Philonthus varians and Platystethus nitens. The variability in activity-density patterns of the aboveground fauna was mainly influenced by the year, but no detrimental effects could be attributed to Bt maize. The only exception being the changes detected in rove beetles, although these differences were transitory and varied from year to year. No changes in species richness and diversity indices for spiders and ground beetles resulted from treatments. However, imidacloprid-treated maize caused a reduction in species richness of rove beetles, even though the abundance of the main species was not reduced. Our results suggest that Bt maize could be compatible with natural enemies that are common in maize fields in Spain.
@article{
 title = {Diversity and seasonal phenology of aboveground arthropods in conventional and transgenic maize crops in Central Spain},
 type = {article},
 year = {2008},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Bt maize,Ground beetles,Non-target arthropods,Pardosa occidentalis,Platystethus nitens,Rove beetles,Spiders},
 pages = {362-371},
 volume = {44},
 websites = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6WBP-4R98K66-1/2/36b9eabadcd1fafeb70783c3c01bdeae},
 id = {9cb1dd98-ec91-309b-835a-9502bc195cb7},
 created = {2012-01-04T22:01:13.000Z},
 file_attached = {false},
 profile_id = {1a467167-0a41-3583-a6a3-034c31031332},
 group_id = {0e532975-1a47-38a4-ace8-4fe5968bcd72},
 last_modified = {2012-01-05T12:54:46.000Z},
 tags = {Bt corn,Europe,Spain,environmental,habitat,non-target},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 source_type = {Journal Article},
 abstract = {One of the major concerns regarding the release of Bt maize is its potential negative impact on non-target organisms present in this crop. In this paper, we compare the temporal phenology and community structure of the aboveground arthropods in commercial Bt maize fields in Central Spain with those of conventional maize crops, with or without an insecticide (imidacloprid) seed treatment, over a period of three years. Spiders, harvestmen, centipedes, ground beetles, rove beetles, carrion beetles, click beetles, earwigs and damsel bugs were captured in pitfall traps every year in sufficient number to provide meaningful phenological data. One predator spider and three omnivorous species of ground beetles have been consistently present in the maize fields: Pardosa occidentalis, Poecilus cupreus, Pseudophonus rufipes and Pseudophonus griseus, respectively. Rove beetles were caught to a lesser extent, with three dominant species: Acrotona aterrima, Philonthus varians and Platystethus nitens. The variability in activity-density patterns of the aboveground fauna was mainly influenced by the year, but no detrimental effects could be attributed to Bt maize. The only exception being the changes detected in rove beetles, although these differences were transitory and varied from year to year. No changes in species richness and diversity indices for spiders and ground beetles resulted from treatments. However, imidacloprid-treated maize caused a reduction in species richness of rove beetles, even though the abundance of the main species was not reduced. Our results suggest that Bt maize could be compatible with natural enemies that are common in maize fields in Spain.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Farinós, Gema P and de la Poza, Marta and Hernández-Crespo, Pedro and Ortego, Félix and Castañera, Pedro},
 journal = {Biological Control},
 number = {3}
}
Downloads: 0