Learning From Less Successful Kaizen Events: A Case Study. Farris, J. A., Van Aken, E. M., Doolen, T. L., & Worley, J. Engineering Management Journal, 20(3):10--20, 2008.
Learning From Less Successful Kaizen Events: A Case Study [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
This paper describes results from an ongoing research program focused on identifying determinants of Kaizen event effectiveness, both in terms of initial event outcomes and the sustainability of outcomes. Although anecdotal published accounts suggest that increasing numbers of companies are using Kaizen events, and that these projects can result in substantial improvement in key business metrics, there is a lack of systematic research on Kaizen events. A particular weakness of the current published accounts is the lack of attention to less successful events — only strongly successful applications of Kaizen events receive much coverage in the accounts; however, the organizational learning literature suggests that understanding less successful cases is a key component of organizational learning. We present a case study from a less successful Kaizen event to demonstrate how the case study event contributed to organizational learning. We also present a set of methods and measures that can be used by practicing engineering managers and engineering management researchers to evaluate and analyze Kaizen event performance. The implications of the case study event for the current body of knowledge on Kaizen events are also examined, and, finally, directions for future research are described. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Engineering Management Journal is the property of American Society for Engineering Management and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
@article{farris_learning_2008,
	title = {Learning {From} {Less} {Successful} {Kaizen} {Events}: {A} {Case} {Study}},
	volume = {20},
	issn = {10429247},
	shorttitle = {Learning {From} {Less} {Successful} {Kaizen} {Events}: {A} {Case} {Study}},
	url = {http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&AN=35409245&site=ehost-live},
	abstract = {This paper describes results from an ongoing research program focused on identifying determinants of Kaizen event effectiveness, both in terms of initial event outcomes and the sustainability of outcomes. Although anecdotal published accounts suggest that increasing numbers of companies are using Kaizen events, and that these projects can result in substantial improvement in key business metrics, there is a lack of systematic research on Kaizen events. A particular weakness of the current published accounts is the lack of attention to less successful events — only strongly successful applications of Kaizen events receive much coverage in the accounts; however, the organizational learning literature suggests that understanding less successful cases is a key component of organizational learning. We present a case study from a less successful Kaizen event to demonstrate how the case study event contributed to organizational learning. We also present a set of methods and measures that can be used by practicing engineering managers and engineering management researchers to evaluate and analyze Kaizen event performance. The implications of the case study event for the current body of knowledge on Kaizen events are also examined, and, finally, directions for future research are described. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Copyright of Engineering Management Journal is the property of American Society for Engineering Management and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)},
	number = {3},
	journal = {Engineering Management Journal},
	author = {Farris, Jennifer A. and Van Aken, Eileen M. and Doolen, Toni L. and Worley, June},
	year = {2008},
	keywords = {BUSINESS development, BUSINESS enterprises, Case studies, Engineering, Lean manufacturing, MANAGEMENT science, Management, ORGANIZATIONAL learning, Organizational behavior, PROCESS optimization, Productivity, Quality Management, Research, Teams, Technology},
	pages = {10--20}
}
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