Noyori hydrogenation: Aromaticity, synchronicity, and activation strain analysis. Faza, O., López, C., & Fernández, I. Journal of Organic Chemistry, 78(11):5669-5676, 2013.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
By means of density functional theory calculations, we have computationally explored the intimacies of the crucial step of Noyori hydrogrogenation reactions of multiple bonds. This process can be considered analogous to the so-called double group transfer reactions. Both kinds of transformations proceed concertedly via the simultaneous migration of two hydrogen atoms/groups in a pericyclic [σ2s + σ2s + π2s] reaction through six-membered transition structures. Despite the structural resemblances of both types of saddle points, significant differences are found in terms of synchronicity and in-plane aromaticity. In addition, the activation strain model has been used to get quantitative insight into the factors which control the corresponding barrier heights. It is found that the presence of a heteroatom in the acceptor moiety is responsible for a remarkable increase of the interaction energy between the reactants which can compensate the destabilizing effect of the strain energy associated with the deformation of the initial reagents leading to low reaction barriers. © 2013 American Chemical Society.
@ARTICLE{Faza20135669,
author={Faza, O.N. and López, C.S. and Fernández, I.},
title={Noyori hydrogenation: Aromaticity, synchronicity, and activation strain analysis},
journal={Journal of Organic Chemistry},
year={2013},
volume={78},
number={11},
pages={5669-5676},
doi={10.1021/jo400837n},
abstract={By means of density functional theory calculations, we have computationally explored the intimacies of the crucial step of Noyori hydrogrogenation reactions of multiple bonds. This process can be considered analogous to the so-called double group transfer reactions. Both kinds of transformations proceed concertedly via the simultaneous migration of two hydrogen atoms/groups in a pericyclic [σ2s + σ2s + π2s] reaction through six-membered transition structures. Despite the structural resemblances of both types of saddle points, significant differences are found in terms of synchronicity and in-plane aromaticity. In addition, the activation strain model has been used to get quantitative insight into the factors which control the corresponding barrier heights. It is found that the presence of a heteroatom in the acceptor moiety is responsible for a remarkable increase of the interaction energy between the reactants which can compensate the destabilizing effect of the strain energy associated with the deformation of the initial reagents leading to low reaction barriers. © 2013 American Chemical Society.},
}
Downloads: 0