Techniques for studying protein trafficking and molecular motors in neurons. Feng, S. & Arnold, D. B Cytoskeleton (Hoboken, N.J.), January, 2016.
Techniques for studying protein trafficking and molecular motors in neurons. [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
This review focuses on techniques that facilitate the visualization of protein trafficking. In the mid-1990's the cloning of GFP allowed fluorescently tagged proteins to be expressed in cells and then visualized in real time. This advance allowed a glimpse, for the first time, of the complex system within cells for distributing proteins. It quickly became apparent, however, that time-lapse sequences of exogenously expressed GFP-labeled proteins can be difficult to interpret. Reasons for this include the relatively low signal that comes from moving proteins and high background rates from stationary proteins and other sources, as well as the difficulty of identifying the origins and destinations of specific vesicular carriers. In this review we will examine a range of techniques that have overcome these issues to varying degrees and discuss the insights into protein trafficking that they have enabled. We will concentrate on neurons, as they are highly polarized and, thus, their trafficking systems tend to be accessible for study. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
@article{feng_techniques_2016,
	title = {Techniques for studying protein trafficking and molecular motors in neurons.},
	issn = {1949-3592},
	url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26800506},
	doi = {10.1002/cm.21274},
	abstract = {This review focuses on techniques that facilitate the visualization of protein trafficking. In the mid-1990's the cloning of GFP allowed fluorescently tagged proteins to be expressed in cells and then visualized in real time. This advance allowed a glimpse, for the first time, of the complex system within cells for distributing proteins. It quickly became apparent, however, that time-lapse sequences of exogenously expressed GFP-labeled proteins can be difficult to interpret. Reasons for this include the relatively low signal that comes from moving proteins and high background rates from stationary proteins and other sources, as well as the difficulty of identifying the origins and destinations of specific vesicular carriers. In this review we will examine a range of techniques that have overcome these issues to varying degrees and discuss the insights into protein trafficking that they have enabled. We will concentrate on neurons, as they are highly polarized and, thus, their trafficking systems tend to be accessible for study. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.},
	journal = {Cytoskeleton (Hoboken, N.J.)},
	author = {Feng, Shanxi and Arnold, Don B},
	month = jan,
	year = {2016},
	pmid = {26800506},
	keywords = {Review}
}
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