Motion Compensation for Video Compression. Feng, J. & Lo, K. T. In Encyclopedia of Multimedia, pages 429–435. Springer US, 2008. 00000
Motion Compensation for Video Compression [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
SynonymsMotion-compensated predictive techniquesDefinitionMotion compensation has been used widely in video compression, because of its abilities to exploit high temporal correlation between successive frames of an image sequence.IntroductionVideo compression [1–4] plays an important role in modern multimedia applications. Inside digitized video, there is a considerable amount of redundancy and compression can be achieved by exploiting such redundancies. The redundancy of video data is generally divided into two classes: statistical redundancy and subjective redundancy. For statistical redundancy, it can be derived from the highly correlated video information both spatially and temporally. For example, adjacent picture elements of a television picture are almost alike and successive pictures often have small changes. Thus the differences among these similar elements are small, and hence the average bit-rate of video data can be saved by sending the differe ...
@incollection{feng_motion_2008,
	title = {Motion {Compensation} for {Video} {Compression}},
	copyright = {©2008 Springer-Verlag},
	isbn = {978-0-387-74724-8 978-0-387-78414-4},
	url = {http://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007/978-0-387-78414-4_114},
	abstract = {SynonymsMotion-compensated predictive techniquesDefinitionMotion compensation has been used widely in video compression, because of its abilities to exploit high temporal correlation between successive frames of an image sequence.IntroductionVideo compression [1–4] plays an important role in modern multimedia applications. Inside digitized video, there is a considerable amount of redundancy and compression can be achieved by exploiting such redundancies. The redundancy of video data is generally divided into two classes: statistical redundancy and subjective redundancy. For statistical redundancy, it can be derived from the highly correlated video information both spatially and temporally. For example, adjacent picture elements of a television picture are almost alike and successive pictures often have small changes. Thus the differences among these similar elements are small, and hence the average bit-rate of video data can be saved by sending the differe ...},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2016-05-03},
	booktitle = {Encyclopedia of {Multimedia}},
	publisher = {Springer US},
	author = {Feng, J. and Lo, K. T.},
	editor = {Furht, Borko},
	year = {2008},
	note = {00000},
	pages = {429--435}
}
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