Multi-level Boundary Classification for Information Extraction. Finn, A. & Kushmerick, N. ECML, 3201(9):111-122, Springer, 2004.
Multi-level Boundary Classification for Information Extraction. [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
It is not very original to claim that explaining the peculiarities of the doctor-patient relationship to pre-clinical medical students is an uneasy task. In general, most students are trained in diseases, not in patients. Later, bedside teaching may help, but often the clinical picture is perceived as being more important than the psychosocial aspects of the sick person. Furthermore, inadequate role modeling by some tutors may make the acquisition of these attitudes and competences difficult. Literature and films provide new ways of introducing medical students to the reality of their future activities. Both the literary works and the films portray important aspects of the medical profession, but I would like to focus on the doctor-patient relationship. Ultimately, the issue concerns how a doctor can remain sensitive to the demands of his or her patients, while avoiding excessive emotional implications in each case. Medical educators should try to convey the need for such sensitivity to their students. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).
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 abstract = {It is not very original to claim that explaining the peculiarities of the doctor-patient relationship to pre-clinical medical students is an uneasy task. In general, most students are trained in diseases, not in patients. Later, bedside teaching may help, but often the clinical picture is perceived as being more important than the psychosocial aspects of the sick person. Furthermore, inadequate role modeling by some tutors may make the acquisition of these attitudes and competences difficult. Literature and films provide new ways of introducing medical students to the reality of their future activities. Both the literary works and the films portray important aspects of the medical profession, but I would like to focus on the doctor-patient relationship. Ultimately, the issue concerns how a doctor can remain sensitive to the demands of his or her patients, while avoiding excessive emotional implications in each case. Medical educators should try to convey the need for such sensitivity to their students. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Finn, Aidan and Kushmerick, Nicholas},
 journal = {ECML},
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}

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