Meiotic drive reduces egg-to-adult viability in stalk-eyed flies. Finnegan, S.; White, N.; Koh, D.; Camus, M.; Fowler, K.; and Pomiankowski, A. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 2019.
abstract   bibtex   
© 2019 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved. A number of species are affected by Sex-Ratio (SR) meiotic drive, a selfish genetic element located on the X-chromosome that causes dysfunction of Y-bearing sperm. SR is transmitted to up to 100% of offspring, causing extreme sex ratio bias. SR in several species is found in a stable polymorphism at a moderate frequency, suggesting there must be strong frequency-dependent selection resisting its spread. We investigate the effect of SR on female and male egg-to-adult viability in the Malaysian stalk-eyed fly, Teleopsis dalmanni. SR meiotic drive in this species is old, and appears to be broadly stable at a moderate (approx. 20%) frequency. We use large-scale controlled crosses to estimate the strength of selection acting against SR in female and male carriers. We find that SR reduces the egg-to-adult viability of both sexes. In females, homozygous females experience greater reduction in viability (sf = 0.242) and the deleterious effects of SR are additive (h = 0.511). The male deficit in viability (sm = 0.214) is not different from that in homozygous females. The evidence does not support the expectation that deleterious side effects of SR are recessive or sex-limited. We discuss how these reductions in egg-to-adult survival, as well as other forms of selection acting on SR, may maintain the SR polymorphism in this species.
@article{
 title = {Meiotic drive reduces egg-to-adult viability in stalk-eyed flies},
 type = {article},
 year = {2019},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Meiotic drive,Selfish genetic element,Sex ratio,Sexual selection,Stalk-eyed fly,Teleopsis},
 volume = {286},
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 created = {2019-09-11T23:59:00.000Z},
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 last_modified = {2021-01-09T17:58:02.659Z},
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 abstract = {© 2019 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved. A number of species are affected by Sex-Ratio (SR) meiotic drive, a selfish genetic element located on the X-chromosome that causes dysfunction of Y-bearing sperm. SR is transmitted to up to 100% of offspring, causing extreme sex ratio bias. SR in several species is found in a stable polymorphism at a moderate frequency, suggesting there must be strong frequency-dependent selection resisting its spread. We investigate the effect of SR on female and male egg-to-adult viability in the Malaysian stalk-eyed fly, Teleopsis dalmanni. SR meiotic drive in this species is old, and appears to be broadly stable at a moderate (approx. 20%) frequency. We use large-scale controlled crosses to estimate the strength of selection acting against SR in female and male carriers. We find that SR reduces the egg-to-adult viability of both sexes. In females, homozygous females experience greater reduction in viability (sf = 0.242) and the deleterious effects of SR are additive (h = 0.511). The male deficit in viability (sm = 0.214) is not different from that in homozygous females. The evidence does not support the expectation that deleterious side effects of SR are recessive or sex-limited. We discuss how these reductions in egg-to-adult survival, as well as other forms of selection acting on SR, may maintain the SR polymorphism in this species.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Finnegan, S.R. and White, N.J. and Koh, D. and Camus, M.F. and Fowler, K. and Pomiankowski, A.},
 journal = {Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
 number = {1910}
}
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