Refugees and Elections: The Effects of Syrians on Voting Behavior in Turkey. Fisunoğlu, A. and Sert, D. Ş International Migration, 57(2):298–312, 2019.
Refugees and Elections: The Effects of Syrians on Voting Behavior in Turkey [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
In the wake of the Syrian civil war, more than three million people have fled to Turkey, which now hosts the largest refugee population on earth. Making up 4.42 per cent of the total population in Turkey as of February 2018, Syrian refugees are nevertheless spread unevenly within its borders. The ratio of refugees to the local population ranges from as high as 99per cent in the city of Kilis to as low as 0.05per cent in Sinop. This article presents findings from the empirical study of the effect of this geographical variation on election outcomes in Turkey, after the arrival of major refugee populations in 2012. Drawing on a unique subnational dataset and ordinary least squares (OLS), generalized least squares (GLS), and difference-in-differences (DiD) regressions, the study compares cities hosting few refugees (control group) with cities with large refugee populations (treatment group) to determine whether significant differences in voting patterns emerged. Our findings show a negative, but insignificant, impact on the incumbent party. The findings have policy implications for Turkey as well as any country that experiences a considerable flow of refugees.
@article{fisunoglu_refugees_2019,
	title = {Refugees and {Elections}: {The} {Effects} of {Syrians} on {Voting} {Behavior} in {Turkey}},
	volume = {57},
	copyright = {© 2018 The Authors. International Migration © 2018 IOM},
	issn = {1468-2435},
	shorttitle = {Refugees and {Elections}},
	url = {https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/imig.12455},
	doi = {10.1111/imig.12455},
	abstract = {In the wake of the Syrian civil war, more than three million people have fled to Turkey, which now hosts the largest refugee population on earth. Making up 4.42 per cent of the total population in Turkey as of February 2018, Syrian refugees are nevertheless spread unevenly within its borders. The ratio of refugees to the local population ranges from as high as 99per cent in the city of Kilis to as low as 0.05per cent in Sinop. This article presents findings from the empirical study of the effect of this geographical variation on election outcomes in Turkey, after the arrival of major refugee populations in 2012. Drawing on a unique subnational dataset and ordinary least squares (OLS), generalized least squares (GLS), and difference-in-differences (DiD) regressions, the study compares cities hosting few refugees (control group) with cities with large refugee populations (treatment group) to determine whether significant differences in voting patterns emerged. Our findings show a negative, but insignificant, impact on the incumbent party. The findings have policy implications for Turkey as well as any country that experiences a considerable flow of refugees.},
	language = {en},
	number = {2},
	urldate = {2020-08-04},
	journal = {International Migration},
	author = {Fisunoğlu, Ali and Sert, Deniz Ş},
	year = {2019},
	pages = {298--312}
}
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