Have Bt Crops Led to Changes in Insecticide Use Patterns and Impacted IPM?. Fitt, G., P. Have Bt Crops Led to Changes in Insecticide Use Patterns and Impacted IPM?, pages 303-328. Springer Netherlands, 2008.
abstract   bibtex   
GM crops have now been commercialised for over ten years and currently over 114 million hectares are grown in 23 countries (James, 2007). By incorporating a powerful pest management tactic within the plant these Bt crops overcome some, but not all of the problems with timing and variable rates of application of insecticides, which reduce efficacy and often result in higher than necessary concentrations being applied than is necessary. The aim of this chapter is to gather the current evidence for impacts of Bt crops, largely Bt cotton and Bt maize, on insecticide use and to reflect on their role in IPM. Analyses of Bt crop performance across a range from large-scale intensive production to smallholder production systems of varying levels of sophistication indicate significant reductions in insecticide input and in some systems, highly significant improvements in yield. However, economic performance is highly variable and seems dependent more on the market characteristics, support structures and culture of the systems in which Bt crops are deployed than on the Bt crops themselves. Given their specificity for key target pests and well demonstrated lack of impact on beneficial insects, Bt crops provide an important new platform for sustainable IPM systems, one that is compatible with a full range of other tactics. However, achieving that IPM outcome will often require ongoing education and extension support for farmers, particularly in smallholder systems, to ensure they can build confidence and gain sustainable benefit from a mix of new and established technologies in pest management.
@inBook{
 title = {Have Bt Crops Led to Changes in Insecticide Use Patterns and Impacted IPM?},
 type = {inBook},
 year = {2008},
 pages = {303-328},
 websites = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-8373-0_11},
 publisher = {Springer Netherlands},
 editors = {[object Object]},
 id = {f8a94872-841c-358a-b17e-269110b56e28},
 created = {2012-01-04T22:01:13.000Z},
 file_attached = {false},
 profile_id = {1a467167-0a41-3583-a6a3-034c31031332},
 group_id = {0e532975-1a47-38a4-ace8-4fe5968bcd72},
 last_modified = {2012-01-05T12:54:49.000Z},
 tags = {Bt corn,Bt cotton,economic,environmental,pesticide use,producer income and expenses,productivity,review},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 source_type = {Book Section},
 abstract = {GM crops have now been commercialised for over ten years and currently over 114 million hectares are grown in 23 countries (James, 2007). By incorporating a powerful pest management tactic within the plant these Bt crops overcome some, but not all of the problems with timing and variable rates of application of insecticides, which reduce efficacy and often result in higher than necessary concentrations being applied than is necessary. The aim of this chapter is to gather the current evidence for impacts of Bt crops, largely Bt cotton and Bt maize, on insecticide use and to reflect on their role in IPM. Analyses of Bt crop performance across a range from large-scale intensive production to smallholder production systems of varying levels of sophistication indicate significant reductions in insecticide input and in some systems, highly significant improvements in yield. However, economic performance is highly variable and seems dependent more on the market characteristics, support structures and culture of the systems in which Bt crops are deployed than on the Bt crops themselves. Given their specificity for key target pests and well demonstrated lack of impact on beneficial insects, Bt crops provide an important new platform for sustainable IPM systems, one that is compatible with a full range of other tactics. However, achieving that IPM outcome will often require ongoing education and extension support for farmers, particularly in smallholder systems, to ensure they can build confidence and gain sustainable benefit from a mix of new and established technologies in pest management.},
 bibtype = {inBook},
 author = {Fitt, Gary P}
}
Downloads: 0