PTCD1 Is Required for Mitochondrial Oxidative-Phosphorylation: Possible Genetic Association with Alzheimer’s Disease. Fleck, D.; Phu, L.; Verschueren, E.; Hinkle, T.; Reichelt, M.; Bhangale, T.; Haley, B.; Wang, Y.; Graham, R.; Kirkpatrick, D. S; Sheng, M.; and Bingol, B. J Neurosci, 39:4636–4656, June, 2019.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
\textlessp\textgreaterIn addition to amyloid-β plaques and tau tangles, mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Neurons heavily rely on mitochondrial function, and deficits in brain energy metabolism are detected early in AD; however, direct human genetic evidence for mitochondrial involvement in AD pathogenesis is limited. We analyzed whole-exome sequencing data of 4549 AD cases and 3332 age-matched controls and discovered that rare protein altering variants in the gene pentatricopeptide repeat-containing protein 1 () show a trend for enrichment in cases compared with controls. We show here that PTCD1 is required for normal mitochondrial rRNA levels, proper assembly of the mitochondrial ribosome and hence for mitochondrial translation and assembly of the electron transport chain. Loss of PTCD1 function impairs oxidative phosphorylation and forces cells to rely on glycolysis for energy production. Cells expressing the AD-linked variant of PTCD1 fail to sustain energy production under increased metabolic stress. In neurons, reduced PTCD1 expression leads to lower ATP levels and impacts spontaneous synaptic activity. Thus, our study uncovers a possible link between a protein required for mitochondrial function and energy metabolism and AD risk. Mitochondria are the main source of cellular energy and mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we identify a variant in the gene that is enriched in AD patients and demonstrate that PTCD1 is required for ATP generation through oxidative phosphorylation. PTCD1 regulates the level of 16S rRNA, the backbone of the mitoribosome, and is essential for mitochondrial translation and assembly of the electron transport chain. Cells expressing the AD-associated variant fail to maintain adequate ATP production during metabolic stress, and reduced PTCD1 activity disrupts neuronal energy homeostasis and dampens spontaneous transmission. Our work provides a mechanistic link between a protein required for mitochondrial function and genetic AD risk.\textless/p\textgreater
@article{fleck_ptcd1_2019,
	title = {{PTCD1} {Is} {Required} for {Mitochondrial} {Oxidative}-{Phosphorylation}: {Possible} {Genetic} {Association} with {Alzheimer}’s {Disease}.},
	volume = {39},
	issn = {1529-2401},
	doi = {10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0116-19.2019},
	abstract = {{\textless}p{\textgreater}In addition to amyloid-β plaques and tau tangles, mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Neurons heavily rely on mitochondrial function, and deficits in brain energy metabolism are detected early in AD; however, direct human genetic evidence for mitochondrial involvement in AD pathogenesis is limited. We analyzed whole-exome sequencing data of 4549 AD cases and 3332 age-matched controls and discovered that rare protein altering variants in the gene pentatricopeptide repeat-containing protein 1 () show a trend for enrichment in cases compared with controls. We show here that PTCD1 is required for normal mitochondrial rRNA levels, proper assembly of the mitochondrial ribosome and hence for mitochondrial translation and assembly of the electron transport chain. Loss of PTCD1 function impairs oxidative phosphorylation and forces cells to rely on glycolysis for energy production. Cells expressing the AD-linked variant of PTCD1 fail to sustain energy production under increased metabolic stress. In neurons, reduced PTCD1 expression leads to lower ATP levels and impacts spontaneous synaptic activity. Thus, our study uncovers a possible link between a protein required for mitochondrial function and energy metabolism and AD risk. Mitochondria are the main source of cellular energy and mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we identify a variant in the gene that is enriched in AD patients and demonstrate that PTCD1 is required for ATP generation through oxidative phosphorylation. PTCD1 regulates the level of 16S rRNA, the backbone of the mitoribosome, and is essential for mitochondrial translation and assembly of the electron transport chain. Cells expressing the AD-associated variant fail to maintain adequate ATP production during metabolic stress, and reduced PTCD1 activity disrupts neuronal energy homeostasis and dampens spontaneous transmission. Our work provides a mechanistic link between a protein required for mitochondrial function and genetic AD risk.{\textless}/p{\textgreater}},
	journal = {J Neurosci},
	author = {Fleck, Daniel and Phu, Lilian and Verschueren, Erik and Hinkle, Trent and Reichelt, Mike and Bhangale, Tushar and Haley, Benjamin and Wang, Yuanyuan and Graham, Robert and Kirkpatrick, Donald S and Sheng, Morgan and Bingol, Baris},
	month = jun,
	year = {2019},
	pages = {4636--4656}
}
Downloads: 0