Does Lunularia cruciata form symbiotic relationships with either Glomus proliferum or G. intraradices?. Fonseca, H. & Berbara, R. Mycological Research, 112(9):1063–1068, September, 2008.
Does Lunularia cruciata form symbiotic relationships with either Glomus proliferum or G. intraradices? [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the behaviour in vitro of Lunularia cruciata grown with Glomus intraradices and G. proliferum , on SRV medium with 29.2 m m sucrose satisfies the requirements of Koch' postulates for mutualistic symbiosis. Hyphae emerging from mycothallus were able to grow over a two-compartment Petri dish barrier and capture and translocate phosphorus into the host liverwort. Thus, there were increases in plant dry weight, higher AM fungi spore production, and higher plant total phosphorus content. Moreover, this colonization of L. cruciata reproduces typical symptoms generally associated with mycorrhizae. These results showed that mycothalli of L. cruciata have available functionalities generally associated with mycorrhizal symbiosis in higher plants; however, the energy/photosynthetic carbon requirements to maintain a mutualistic symbiosis may be a limiting factor in vivo . Features here discussed indicate that, at least in tested experimental conditions, the endophytic association of L. cruciata with both G. intraradices and G. proliferum is a parasitic/opportunistic partnership rather than a mutualistic symbiosis.
@article{fonseca_does_2008,
	title = {Does {Lunularia} cruciata form symbiotic relationships with either {Glomus} proliferum or {G}. intraradices?},
	volume = {112},
	issn = {09537562},
	url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mycres.2008.03.008},
	doi = {10.1016/j.mycres.2008.03.008},
	abstract = {The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the behaviour  in vitro  of  Lunularia cruciata  grown with  Glomus intraradices  and  G. proliferum , on SRV medium with 29.2 m m  sucrose satisfies the requirements of Koch' postulates for mutualistic symbiosis. Hyphae emerging from mycothallus were able to grow over a two-compartment Petri dish barrier and capture and translocate phosphorus into the host liverwort. Thus, there were increases in plant dry weight, higher AM fungi spore production, and higher plant total phosphorus content. Moreover, this colonization of  L. cruciata  reproduces typical symptoms generally associated with mycorrhizae. These results showed that mycothalli of  L. cruciata  have available functionalities generally associated with mycorrhizal symbiosis in higher plants; however, the energy/photosynthetic carbon requirements to maintain a mutualistic symbiosis may be a limiting factor  in vivo . Features here discussed indicate that, at least in tested experimental conditions, the endophytic association of  L. cruciata  with both  G. intraradices  and  G. proliferum  is a parasitic/opportunistic partnership rather than a mutualistic symbiosis.},
	number = {9},
	journal = {Mycological Research},
	author = {Fonseca, Henrique and Berbara, RLL},
	month = sep,
	year = {2008},
	keywords = {crn2014},
	pages = {1063--1068}
}
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