Does eyewitness and interviewer gender influence children’s reports? An experimental analysis of eyewitness and interviewer gender on children’s testimony. Foster, I.; Wyman, J.; Tong, D.; Colwell, K.; and Talwar, V. Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, 26(4):499–519, 2019. Citation Key Alias: lens.org/021-752-791-677-978 tex.address: [object Object] tex.affiliation: [object Object] tex.author-email: [object Object] tex.da: [object Object] tex.doc-delivery-number: [object Object] tex.eissn: [object Object] tex.funding-acknowledgement: [object Object] tex.funding-text: [object Object] tex.journal-iso: [object Object] tex.keywords-plus: [object Object] tex.number-of-cited-references: [object Object] tex.publisher: [object Object] tex.research-areas: [object Object] tex.times-cited: [object Object] tex.type: [object Object] tex.unique-id: [object Object] tex.usage-count-last-180-days: [object Object] tex.usage-count-since-2013: [object Object] tex.web-of-science-categories: [object Object]
Does eyewitness and interviewer gender influence children’s reports? An experimental analysis of eyewitness and interviewer gender on children’s testimony [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
This study examines how children's age, gender and interviewer gender affected children's testimony after witnessing a theft. Children (N=127, age = 6-11 years) witnessed an experimenter (E1) find money, which he/she may/may not have taken. E1 then asked the children to falsely deny that the theft occurred, falsely accuse E1 of taking the money, or tell the truth when interviewed by a second experimenter. Falsely denying or falsely accusing influenced children's forthcomingness and quality of their testimony. When accusing, boys were significantly more willing than girls to disclose about the theft earlier and without being asked directly. When truthfully accusing, children gave lengthier testimony to same-gendered adults. When denying, children were significantly more willing to disclose the theft earlier to male interviewers than to females. As children aged, they were significantly less likely to lie, more likely to disclose earlier when accusing, and give lengthier and more consistent testimony.
@article{ISI:000482594200001,
	title = {Does eyewitness and interviewer gender influence children’s reports? {An} experimental analysis of eyewitness and interviewer gender on children’s testimony},
	volume = {26},
	issn = {1321-8719},
	url = {https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13218719.2018.1507844},
	doi = {10.1080/13218719.2018.1507844},
	abstract = {This study examines how children's age, gender and interviewer gender affected children's testimony after witnessing a theft. Children (N=127, age = 6-11 years) witnessed an experimenter (E1) find money, which he/she may/may not have taken. E1 then asked the children to falsely deny that the theft occurred, falsely accuse E1 of taking the money, or tell the truth when interviewed by a second experimenter. Falsely denying or falsely accusing influenced children's forthcomingness and quality of their testimony. When accusing, boys were significantly more willing than girls to disclose about the theft earlier and without being asked directly. When truthfully accusing, children gave lengthier testimony to same-gendered adults. When denying, children were significantly more willing to disclose the theft earlier to male interviewers than to females. As children aged, they were significantly less likely to lie, more likely to disclose earlier when accusing, and give lengthier and more consistent testimony.},
	language = {English},
	number = {4},
	journal = {Psychiatry, Psychology and Law},
	author = {Foster, Ida and Wyman, Joshua and Tong, Donia and Colwell, Kevin and Talwar, Victoria},
	year = {2019},
	note = {Citation Key Alias: lens.org/021-752-791-677-978
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	keywords = {children, dept.psy, disclosures, false accusations, false denials, gender, interviewer gender, lying},
	pages = {499--519}
}
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