Brain imaging and the bill of rights: Memory detection technologies and American criminal justice. Fox, D. The American Journal of Bioethics, 8(1):34–36, 2008.
Brain imaging and the bill of rights: Memory detection technologies and American criminal justice [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
[first paragraph] Memory detection technologies could transform the charac- ter of criminal justice in the United States. Neurological test results provide information on the basis of which to resolve contested factual disputes in criminal trials. Because foren- sic neurotechnologymeasures involuntary (andthusuncon- trollable) brain activities, these techniques promise superior reliability over traditional polygraph machines, which mea- sure physiological functions that a subject may be able to control and learn to manipulate.
@article{Fox2008,
abstract = {[first paragraph] Memory detection technologies could transform the charac- ter of criminal justice in the United States. Neurological test results provide information on the basis of which to resolve contested factual disputes in criminal trials. Because foren- sic neurotechnologymeasures involuntary (andthusuncon- trollable) brain activities, these techniques promise superior reliability over traditional polygraph machines, which mea- sure physiological functions that a subject may be able to control and learn to manipulate.},
author = {Fox, Dov},
doi = {10.1080/15265160701828451},
file = {:Users/michaelk/Library/Application Support/Mendeley Desktop/Downloaded/Fox - 2008 - Brain imaging and the bill of rights Memory detection technologies and American criminal justice.pdf:pdf},
issn = {1526-5161},
journal = {The American Journal of Bioethics},
number = {1},
pages = {34--36},
title = {{Brain imaging and the bill of rights: Memory detection technologies and American criminal justice}},
url = {http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15265160701828451},
volume = {8},
year = {2008}
}
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