Climate-change not only threatens bird populations but also challenges our ability to monitor them. Fox, A., D.; Nielsen, R., D.; and Petersen, I., K. Ibis, 161:467-474, 2019.
abstract   bibtex   
Mid‐winter sea surface temperatures in the Barents and Kara Seas have shown amplified warming since the mid‐2000s, rapidly removing winter sea‐ice from very extensive areas along the northern Russian Arctic coast, associated with reductions in the extent of winter sea‐ice in the White and Baltic Seas, as well as ice cover in coastal and inland freshwaters throughout the region. Recent northern European studies have shown substantial north and east shifts in the wintering distributions of in particular diving duck species compared with their former distributions in response to climate warming. The very sudden availability of open water in the Russian Arctic offers novel overwintering habitat especially to sea ducks in the marine environment, but also to other species using currently unsurveyed brackish and freshwater areas far to the north and east of their former wintering range. These major climate change effects constitute a particular challenge to our abilities to monitor adequately the distribution and abundance of many of our common ducks, especially the sea ducks, quarry species and other waterbirds of conservation importance, but also potentially many other terrestrial bird populations.
@article{
 title = {Climate-change not only threatens bird populations but also challenges our ability to monitor them},
 type = {article},
 year = {2019},
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 pages = {467-474},
 volume = {161},
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 abstract = {Mid‐winter sea surface temperatures in the Barents and Kara Seas have shown amplified warming since the mid‐2000s, rapidly removing winter sea‐ice from very extensive areas along the northern Russian Arctic coast, associated with reductions in the extent of winter sea‐ice in the White and Baltic Seas, as well as ice cover in coastal and inland freshwaters throughout the region. Recent northern European studies have shown substantial north and east shifts in the wintering distributions of in particular diving duck species compared with their former distributions in response to climate warming. The very sudden availability of open water in the Russian Arctic offers novel overwintering habitat especially to sea ducks in the marine environment, but also to other species using currently unsurveyed brackish and freshwater areas far to the north and east of their former wintering range. These major climate change effects constitute a particular challenge to our abilities to monitor adequately the distribution and abundance of many of our common ducks, especially the sea ducks, quarry species and other waterbirds of conservation importance, but also potentially many other terrestrial bird populations.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Fox, Anthony D. and Nielsen, RaSmus Due and Petersen, Ib Krag},
 journal = {Ibis}
}
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