Domain-Specific Modeling Languages: Requirements Analysis and Design Guidelines. Frank, U. In Reinhartz-Berger, I., Sturm, A., Clark, T., Cohen, S., & Bettin, J., editors, Domain Engineering, pages 133--157. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2013. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-36654-3_6
Domain-Specific Modeling Languages: Requirements Analysis and Design Guidelines [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
In recent years, the development of domain-specific modeling languages has gained remarkable attention. This is for good reasons. A domain-specific modeling language incorporates concepts that represent domain-level knowledge. Hence, systems analysts are not forced to reconstruct these concepts from scratch. At the same time, domain-specific modeling languages contribute to model integrity, because they include already constraints that would otherwise have to be added manually. Even though there has been a considerable amount of research on developing and using domain-specific modeling languages, there is still lack of comprehensive methods to guide the design of these languages. With respect to the complexity and risk related to developing a domain-specific modeling language, this is a serious shortfall. This chapter is aimed at a contribution to filling the gap. At first, it presents guidelines for selecting a metamodeling language. Its main focus is on supporting the process from analyzing requirements to specifying and evaluating a domain-specific modeling language.
@incollection{frank_domain-specific_2013,
	title = {Domain-{Specific} {Modeling} {Languages}: {Requirements} {Analysis} and {Design} {Guidelines}},
	copyright = {©2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg},
	isbn = {978-3-642-36653-6 978-3-642-36654-3},
	shorttitle = {Domain-{Specific} {Modeling} {Languages}},
	url = {http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-36654-3_6},
	abstract = {In recent years, the development of domain-specific modeling languages has gained remarkable attention. This is for good reasons. A domain-specific modeling language incorporates concepts that represent domain-level knowledge. Hence, systems analysts are not forced to reconstruct these concepts from scratch. At the same time, domain-specific modeling languages contribute to model integrity, because they include already constraints that would otherwise have to be added manually. Even though there has been a considerable amount of research on developing and using domain-specific modeling languages, there is still lack of comprehensive methods to guide the design of these languages. With respect to the complexity and risk related to developing a domain-specific modeling language, this is a serious shortfall. This chapter is aimed at a contribution to filling the gap. At first, it presents guidelines for selecting a metamodeling language. Its main focus is on supporting the process from analyzing requirements to specifying and evaluating a domain-specific modeling language.},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2017-05-04TZ},
	booktitle = {Domain {Engineering}},
	publisher = {Springer Berlin Heidelberg},
	author = {Frank, Ulrich},
	editor = {Reinhartz-Berger, Iris and Sturm, Arnon and Clark, Tony and Cohen, Sholom and Bettin, Jorn},
	year = {2013},
	note = {DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-36654-3\_6},
	keywords = {Design of DSML, Design process of DSML, Graphical notation of DSML, Information Systems Applications (incl. Internet), Quality of DSML, Requirements analysis of DSML, Simulation and Modeling, Software engineering},
	pages = {133--157}
}
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