Detecting semantic changes in Alzheimer's disease with vector space models. Fraser, K. C. & Hirst, G. In Workshop on Resources and ProcessIng of Linguistic and Extra-Linguistic Data from People with Various Forms of Cognitive/Psychiatric Impairments (RaPID-2016), pages ???--???, Portorož, Slovenia, May, 2016.
abstract   bibtex   
Numerous studies have shown that language impairments, particularly semantic deficits, are evident in the narrative speech of people with Alzheimer's disease from the earliest stages of the disease. Here, we present a novel technique for capturing those changes, by comparing distributed word representations constructed from healthy controls and Alzheimer's patients. We investigate examples of words with different representations in the two spaces, and link the semantic and contextual differences to findings from the Alzheimer's disease literature.
@inproceedings{Fraser10,
   author = {Kathleen C. Fraser and Graeme Hirst},
   title = {Detecting semantic changes in Alzheimer's disease with vector space models},
   address = {Portoro\v{z}, Slovenia},
   booktitle = {Workshop on Resources and ProcessIng of Linguistic and
                  Extra-Linguistic Data from People with Various Forms
                  of Cognitive/Psychiatric Impairments (RaPID-2016)},
   pages = {???--???},
   year = {2016},
   month = {May},
   download = {http://ftp.cs.toronto.edu/pub/gh/Fraser+Hirst-2016.pdf},
   abstract = {Numerous studies have shown that language impairments,
                  particularly semantic deficits, are evident in the
                  narrative speech of people with Alzheimer's disease
                  from the earliest stages of the disease. Here, we
                  present a novel technique for capturing those
                  changes, by comparing distributed word
                  representations constructed from healthy controls
                  and Alzheimer's patients. We investigate examples of
                  words with different representations in the two
                  spaces, and link the semantic and contextual
                  differences to findings from the Alzheimer's disease
                  literature.} 
}
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