Self-assembling peptide-based delivery of therapeutics for myocardial infarction. French, K. M., Somasuntharam, I., & Davis, M. E. Adv Drug Deliv Rev, 96:40–53, 2016.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
Cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction, is the number one cause of death. Current treatments are palliative and slow the progression toward heart failure, but to not regenerate healthy tissue. Self-assembling peptides are biomimietic, readily produced, non-immunogenic and non-cytotoxic. They do not assemble into hydrogels until triggered, allowing them to be injected into the myocardium and providing opportunities for minimally invasive therapies. The ability to tune the mechanical and bioactive properties of self-assembling peptides will continue to make them readily adaptable for mimicking natural microenvironments. To date, a variety of growth factors and signaling moieties have been incorporated into self-assembling peptide hydrogels, enhancing cell behavior and tissue function. Furthermore, the hydrogels serve as delivery vehicles for cells in vivo and platforms for improved cell culture. In addition to a brief review of self-assembling peptides, we will discuss a variety of their approaches for myocardial infarction therapy. Moreover, we will assess approaches taken in other tissue and discuss how these could benefit therapies for myocardial infarction.
@article{french_self-assembling_2016,
	title = {Self-assembling peptide-based delivery of therapeutics for myocardial infarction},
	volume = {96},
	issn = {0169-409x},
	doi = {10.1016/j.addr.2015.04.023},
	abstract = {Cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction, is the number one cause of death. Current treatments are palliative and slow the progression toward heart failure, but to not regenerate healthy tissue. Self-assembling peptides are biomimietic, readily produced, non-immunogenic and non-cytotoxic. They do not assemble into hydrogels until triggered, allowing them to be injected into the myocardium and providing opportunities for minimally invasive therapies. The ability to tune the mechanical and bioactive properties of self-assembling peptides will continue to make them readily adaptable for mimicking natural microenvironments. To date, a variety of growth factors and signaling moieties have been incorporated into self-assembling peptide hydrogels, enhancing cell behavior and tissue function. Furthermore, the hydrogels serve as delivery vehicles for cells in vivo and platforms for improved cell culture. In addition to a brief review of self-assembling peptides, we will discuss a variety of their approaches for myocardial infarction therapy. Moreover, we will assess approaches taken in other tissue and discuss how these could benefit therapies for myocardial infarction.},
	journal = {Adv Drug Deliv Rev},
	author = {French, K. M. and Somasuntharam, I. and Davis, M. E.},
	year = {2016},
	keywords = {Biomaterials Biomimetic Cell culture Cell therapy Material properties Protein delivery Tissue engineering},
	pages = {40--53},
}
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