Selective attention to threat versus reward: Meta-analysis and neural-network modeling of the dot-probe task. Frewen, P. A., Dozois, D. J. A., Joanisse, M. F., & Neufeld, R. W. J. Clinical Psychology Review, 28(2):307--337, 2008.
Selective attention to threat versus reward: Meta-analysis and neural-network modeling of the dot-probe task [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Two decades of research conducted to date has examined selective visual attention to threat and reward stimuli as a function of individual differences in anxiety using the dot-probe task. The present study tests a connectionist neural-network model of meta-analytic and key individual-study results derived from this literature. Attentional bias for threatening and reward-related stimuli is accounted for by connectionist model implementation of the following clinical psychology and affective neuroscience principles: 1) affective learning and temperament, 2) state and trait anxiety, 3) intensity appraisal, 4) affective chronometry, 5) attentional control, and 6) selective attention training. Theoretical implications for the study of mood and anxiety disorders are discussed.
@article{frewen_selective_2008,
	title = {Selective attention to threat versus reward: {Meta}-analysis and neural-network modeling of the dot-probe task},
	volume = {28},
	issn = {0272-7358},
	shorttitle = {Selective attention to threat versus reward},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272735807001067},
	doi = {10.1016/j.cpr.2007.05.006},
	abstract = {Two decades of research conducted to date has examined selective visual attention to threat and reward stimuli as a function of individual differences in anxiety using the dot-probe task. The present study tests a connectionist neural-network model of meta-analytic and key individual-study results derived from this literature. Attentional bias for threatening and reward-related stimuli is accounted for by connectionist model implementation of the following clinical psychology and affective neuroscience principles: 1) affective learning and temperament, 2) state and trait anxiety, 3) intensity appraisal, 4) affective chronometry, 5) attentional control, and 6) selective attention training. Theoretical implications for the study of mood and anxiety disorders are discussed.},
	number = {2},
	urldate = {2015-08-06TZ},
	journal = {Clinical Psychology Review},
	author = {Frewen, Paul A. and Dozois, David J. A. and Joanisse, Marc F. and Neufeld, Richard W. J.},
	year = {2008},
	keywords = {Amygdala, Connectionism, Dot-probe task, Reward, Selective attention, Threat, anxiety, depression, neural network},
	pages = {307--337}
}
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