Breaking Gender Barriers Through Literature in the Elementary and Pre-School Classroom. Frieden, B. J. and Laffin, J. G. Master's thesis, St. Catherine University, St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019.
Breaking Gender Barriers Through Literature in the Elementary and Pre-School Classroom [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
The following research assesses how reading and discussing stories that counter gender stereotypes can increase cooperation and decrease conflict between primary- and elementary-aged students of different genders, as well as to expand students’ conceptions of self and others beyond traditional gender expectations. The six-week study involved 50 participants total, 21 between the ages of 3 and 6 and 29 between the ages of 6 and 9 at two separate Montessori public charter schools in Minnesota. Each participant completed an activity pre- and post-intervention concerning the feminine and masculine traits that they would choose to describe themselves and those that could describe someone they’d want to be friends with. 10-minute observations were taken daily to record instances of cooperation and conflict between children of different genders. Pertinent quotes were recorded during observation periods and in discussions about the counter-stereotypical stories. Results showed an increase in the number of friendships between genders, and a greater number of traits chosen to describe selves and potential friends at the elementary school level. Further research in the area is needed to discover the long-term effects of counter-stereotypical literature, the importance of adults examining their own gender biases, and interventions beyond literature to counter patriarchal norms in classrooms.
@mastersthesis{frieden_breaking_2019,
	address = {St. Paul, Minnesota},
	title = {Breaking {Gender} {Barriers} {Through} {Literature} in the {Elementary} and {Pre}-{School} {Classroom}},
	url = {https://sophia.stkate.edu/maed/304},
	abstract = {The following research assesses how reading and discussing stories that counter gender stereotypes can increase cooperation and decrease conflict between primary- and elementary-aged students of different genders, as well as to expand students’ conceptions of self and others beyond traditional gender expectations. The six-week study involved 50 participants total, 21 between the ages of 3 and 6 and 29 between the ages of 6 and 9 at two separate Montessori public charter schools in Minnesota. Each participant completed an activity pre- and post-intervention concerning the feminine and masculine traits that they would choose to describe themselves and those that could describe someone they’d want to be friends with. 10-minute observations were taken daily to record instances of cooperation and conflict between children of different genders. Pertinent quotes were recorded during observation periods and in discussions about the counter-stereotypical stories. Results showed an increase in the number of friendships between genders, and a greater number of traits chosen to describe selves and potential friends at the elementary school level. Further research in the area is needed to discover the long-term effects of counter-stereotypical literature, the importance of adults examining their own gender biases, and interventions beyond literature to counter patriarchal norms in classrooms.},
	language = {eng},
	school = {St. Catherine University},
	author = {Frieden, Bonnie J. and Laffin, Jenna G.},
	year = {2019}
}
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