Time pressure modulates electrophysiological correlates of early visual processing. Fründ, I., Busch, N. A., Schadow, J., Gruber, T., Körner, U., & Herrmann, C. S. PLoS One, 3(2):e1675, 2008.
Time pressure modulates electrophysiological correlates of early visual processing [pdf]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Reactions to sensory events sometimes require quick responses whereas at other times they require a high degree of accuracy-usually resulting in slower responses. It is important to understand whether visual processing under different response speed requirements employs different neural mechanisms.We asked participants to classify visual patterns with different levels of detail as real-world or non-sense objects. In one condition, participants were to respond immediately, whereas in the other they responded after a delay of 1 second. As expected, participants performed more accurately in delayed response trials. This effect was pronounced for stimuli with a high level of detail. These behavioral effects were accompanied by modulations of stimulus related EEG gamma oscillations which are an electrophysiological correlate of early visual processing. In trials requiring speeded responses, early stimulus-locked oscillations discriminated real-world and non-sense objects irrespective of the level of detail. For stimuli with a higher level of detail, oscillatory power in a later time window discriminated real-world and non-sense objects irrespective of response speed requirements.Thus, it seems plausible to assume that different response speed requirements trigger different dynamics of processing.
@article{frund_time_2008,
	title = {Time pressure modulates electrophysiological correlates of early visual processing},
	volume = {3},
	url = {http://oszilla.hgs.hu-berlin.de/Publicationlist/2008/Fründ_etall_pone_2008.pdf},
	doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0001675},
	abstract = {Reactions to sensory events sometimes require quick responses whereas at other times they require a high degree of accuracy-usually resulting in slower responses. It is important to understand whether visual processing under different response speed requirements employs different neural mechanisms.We asked participants to classify visual patterns with different levels of detail as real-world or non-sense objects. In one condition, participants were to respond immediately, whereas in the other they responded after a delay of 1 second. As expected, participants performed more accurately in delayed response trials. This effect was pronounced for stimuli with a high level of detail. These behavioral effects were accompanied by modulations of stimulus related EEG gamma oscillations which are an electrophysiological correlate of early visual processing. In trials requiring speeded responses, early stimulus-locked oscillations discriminated real-world and non-sense objects irrespective of the level of detail. For stimuli with a higher level of detail, oscillatory power in a later time window discriminated real-world and non-sense objects irrespective of response speed requirements.Thus, it seems plausible to assume that different response speed requirements trigger different dynamics of processing.},
	language = {eng},
	number = {2},
	journal = {PLoS One},
	author = {Fründ, Ingo and Busch, Niko A. and Schadow, Jeanette and Gruber, Thomas and Körner, Ursula and Herrmann, Christoph S.},
	year = {2008},
	keywords = {Electroencephalography, Electrophysiology, Evoked Potentials, Humans, Pattern Recognition, Reaction Time, Visual, Visual Perception, physiology},
	pages = {e1675}
}
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