Assessing climate change impacts on wetlands in a flow regulated catchment: A case study in the Macquarie Marshes, Australia. Fu, B., Pollino, C., A., Cuddy, S., M., & Andrews, F. Journal of environmental management, 157:127-138, 4, 2015.
Assessing climate change impacts on wetlands in a flow regulated catchment: A case study in the Macquarie Marshes, Australia. [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Globally wetlands are increasingly under threat due to changes in water regimes as a result of river regulation and climate change. We developed the Exploring CLimAte Impacts on Management (EXCLAIM) decision support system (DSS), which simulates flow-driven habitat condition for 16 vegetation species, 13 waterbird species and 4 fish groups in the Macquarie catchment, Australia. The EXCLAIM DSS estimates impacts to habitat condition, considering scenarios of climate change and water management. The model framework underlying the DSS is a probabilistic Bayesian network, and this approach was chosen to explicitly represent uncertainties in climate change scenarios and predicted ecological outcomes. The results suggest that the scenario with no climate change and no water resource development (i.e. flow condition without dams, weirs or water license entitlements, often regarded as a surrogate for 'natural' flow) consistently has the most beneficial outcomes for vegetation, waterbird and native fish. The 2030 dry climate change scenario delivers the poorest ecological outcomes overall, whereas the 2030 wet climate change scenario has beneficial outcomes for waterbird breeding, but delivers poor outcomes for river red gum and black box woodlands, and fish that prefer river channels as habitats. A formal evaluation of the waterbird breeding model showed that higher numbers of observed nest counts are typically associated with higher modelled average breeding habitat conditions. The EXCLAIM DSS provides a generic framework to link hydrology and ecological habitats for a large number of species, based on best available knowledge of their flood requirements. It is a starting point towards developing an integrated tool for assessing climate change impacts on wetland ecosystems.
@article{
 title = {Assessing climate change impacts on wetlands in a flow regulated catchment: A case study in the Macquarie Marshes, Australia.},
 type = {article},
 year = {2015},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Climate change,Decision support system,Habitat condition,Ramsar wetland},
 pages = {127-138},
 volume = {157},
 websites = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301479715300244},
 month = {4},
 day = {17},
 id = {6ac1efdc-afed-397c-96c2-d95ddc982173},
 created = {2015-04-29T18:49:46.000Z},
 accessed = {2015-04-29},
 file_attached = {false},
 profile_id = {95e10851-cdf3-31de-9f82-1ab629e601b0},
 group_id = {71a29c65-85d2-3809-a3a1-fe4a94dc78d2},
 last_modified = {2017-03-14T14:27:45.955Z},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {Globally wetlands are increasingly under threat due to changes in water regimes as a result of river regulation and climate change. We developed the Exploring CLimAte Impacts on Management (EXCLAIM) decision support system (DSS), which simulates flow-driven habitat condition for 16 vegetation species, 13 waterbird species and 4 fish groups in the Macquarie catchment, Australia. The EXCLAIM DSS estimates impacts to habitat condition, considering scenarios of climate change and water management. The model framework underlying the DSS is a probabilistic Bayesian network, and this approach was chosen to explicitly represent uncertainties in climate change scenarios and predicted ecological outcomes. The results suggest that the scenario with no climate change and no water resource development (i.e. flow condition without dams, weirs or water license entitlements, often regarded as a surrogate for 'natural' flow) consistently has the most beneficial outcomes for vegetation, waterbird and native fish. The 2030 dry climate change scenario delivers the poorest ecological outcomes overall, whereas the 2030 wet climate change scenario has beneficial outcomes for waterbird breeding, but delivers poor outcomes for river red gum and black box woodlands, and fish that prefer river channels as habitats. A formal evaluation of the waterbird breeding model showed that higher numbers of observed nest counts are typically associated with higher modelled average breeding habitat conditions. The EXCLAIM DSS provides a generic framework to link hydrology and ecological habitats for a large number of species, based on best available knowledge of their flood requirements. It is a starting point towards developing an integrated tool for assessing climate change impacts on wetland ecosystems.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Fu, Baihua and Pollino, Carmel A and Cuddy, Susan M and Andrews, Felix},
 journal = {Journal of environmental management}
}

Downloads: 0