Houses As Energy Delivering Systems. Fuchs, M. Ph.D. Thesis, Delft University of Technology, Delft, 2008.
Houses As Energy Delivering Systems [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Sustainability gets a more and more important issue in daily practice. Be it in the supermarket when we select products for its organic ingredients or in the moment when we decide to buy an environmentally friendly car. Driving force in this process is the increased awareness of limited fossil resources and progressing global warming. Due to this slow growing awareness the countries of the EU have given their commitment to counter these effects. EU-policies were developed to limit the use of fossil fuels and reduce the emission of carbon dioxide, which causes global warming. The construction sector is one of the biggest consumers of natural resources. The Dutch built environment consumes one third of the national total energy [Opstelten et al, 2007]. Households in The Netherlands consume 15% of the national primary energy [Dril et al., 2005]. The Dutch research institutes TNO and ECN have set up a strategic co-operation, called 'Building Future' with the target of a fossil fuel free built environment in The Netherlands by 2050 [Opstelten et al, 2007]. Part of this co-operation is the programme 'WAELS III - Woning als Energieleverend Systeem, which was initiated by TNO, ECN, and the University of Technologies Eindhoven (TU/e) in 2006. This research 'Houses As Energy Delivering Systems' is embedded into 'WAELS III'. It aims at the design of a sustainable and feasible building concept with minimized energy demands. This thesis investigates and evaluates technologies and design approaches, which contribute to the desired vision of the 'fossil fuel free built environment'.
@phdthesis{fuchs_houses_2008,
	address = {Delft},
	type = {Graduation {Report}},
	title = {Houses {As} {Energy} {Delivering} {Systems}},
	url = {https://repository.tudelft.nl/islandora/object/uuid:1c5487cb-3802-4f9c-ae18-5143b70c339a/datastream/OBJ},
	abstract = {Sustainability gets a more and more important issue in daily practice. Be it in the supermarket when we select products for its organic ingredients or in the moment when we decide to buy an environmentally friendly car. Driving force in this process is the increased awareness of limited fossil resources and progressing global warming.
Due to this slow growing awareness the countries of the EU have given their commitment to counter these effects. EU-policies were developed to limit the use of fossil fuels and reduce the emission of carbon dioxide, which causes global warming.
The construction sector is one of the biggest consumers of natural resources. The Dutch built environment consumes one third of the national total energy [Opstelten et al, 2007]. Households in The Netherlands consume 15\% of the national primary energy [Dril et al., 2005].
The Dutch research institutes TNO and ECN have set up a strategic co-operation, called 'Building Future' with the target of a fossil fuel free built environment in The Netherlands by 2050 [Opstelten et al, 2007]. Part of this co-operation is the programme 'WAELS III - Woning als Energieleverend Systeem, which was initiated by TNO, ECN, and the University of Technologies Eindhoven (TU/e) in 2006.
This research 'Houses As Energy Delivering Systems' is embedded into 'WAELS III'. It aims at the design of a sustainable and feasible building concept with minimized energy demands. This thesis investigates and evaluates technologies and design approaches, which contribute to the desired vision of the 'fossil fuel free built environment'.},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2020-08-02},
	school = {Delft University of Technology},
	author = {Fuchs, Marcel},
	year = {2008}
}
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