The effects of high frame rate on perception of 2-D and 3-D global coherent motion. Fujii, Y., Allison, R. S., Shen, L., & Wilcox, L. M. In Centre for Vision Research International Conference on Perceptual Organization, pages 55. York University, Toronto, June 23-26, 2015, 2015.
The effects of high frame rate on perception of 2-D and 3-D global coherent motion [link]-1  abstract   bibtex   
Digital technologies allow movies to be exhibited at frame rates much higher than the traditional 24 fps. High frame rate (HFR) movies being released in theaters and it is assumed that HFR will reduce artifacts and enhance quality of motion in 2-D and 3-D media. The goal of this project is to assess this assumption empirically by basic measurement of motion perception. In a series of experiments we measured lateral (2-D) and in depth (3-D) global motion coherence thresholds using random-dot patterns in a mirror stereoscope and a 3D projection system. The refresh rate of the display was fixed at 96 Hz, and we manipulated the flash protocol to create 96 (single flash), 48 (double flash) and 24 (quadruple flash) frames per second. Simulated linear velocity of the elements through space was equated in the 2-D and 3-D conditions. Conditions were randomly interleaved using the method of constant stimuli and a two-interval forced-choice procedure to measure the proportion of coherent elements required to reliably detect global motion. Results showed no consistent effect of flash protocol on coherence thresholds in either the 2-D or the 3-D conditions in both the stereoscope and 3D projection system. Our results show that while frame rate influences local 2-D motion processing, it has no apparent impact on global lateral, or in depth, motion coherence perception. This indicates that progression in quality of motion signal does not always enhance perception.
@incollection{Fujii:2015fk,
	Abstract = {Digital technologies allow movies to be exhibited at frame rates much higher than the traditional 24 fps. High frame rate (HFR) movies being released in theaters and it is assumed that HFR will reduce artifacts and enhance quality of motion in 2-D and 3-D media. The goal of this project is to assess this assumption empirically by basic measurement of motion perception. In a series of experiments we measured lateral (2-D) and in depth (3-D) global motion coherence thresholds using random-dot patterns in a mirror stereoscope and a 3D projection system. The refresh rate of the display was fixed at 96 Hz, and we manipulated the flash protocol to create 96 (single flash), 48 (double flash) and 24 (quadruple flash) frames per second. Simulated linear velocity of the elements through space was equated in the 2-D and 3-D conditions. Conditions were randomly interleaved using the method of constant stimuli and a two-interval forced-choice procedure to measure the proportion of coherent elements required to reliably detect global motion. Results showed no consistent effect of flash protocol on coherence thresholds in either the 2-D or the 3-D conditions in both the stereoscope and 3D projection system. Our results show that while frame rate influences local 2-D motion processing, it has no apparent impact on global lateral, or in depth, motion coherence perception. This indicates that progression in quality of motion signal does not always enhance perception. },
	Annote = {June 23-26, 2015 York University},
	Author = {Fujii, Y. and Allison, Robert S. and Shen, L. and Wilcox, Laurie M.},
	Booktitle = {Centre for Vision Research International Conference on Perceptual Organization},
	Date-Added = {2015-06-14 15:20:51 +0000},
	Date-Modified = {2015-06-23 11:37:53 +0000},
	Keywords = {Stereopsis},
	Language = {en},
	Month = {June 23-26, 2015},
	Pages = {55},
	Publisher = {York University, Toronto},
	Title = {The effects of high frame rate on perception of 2-D and 3-D global coherent motion},
	Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1167/14.15.55},
	Year = {2015}}

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