Broadcast Encryption. Furht, B., editor In Encyclopedia of Multimedia, pages 56–56. Springer US, 2008. 00000
Broadcast Encryption [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
DefinitionIn one-way communication system, broadcast encryption is intended to provide a means for two parties not known to each other, to communicate a cryptographic key for content protection and other applications.Broadcast encryption was first proposed by Fiat, et al., of IBM [1]. The initial goal was to allow a central broadcast site to broadcast secure transmissions to an arbitrary set of recipients while minimizing key management related transmissions. If we use a naïe approach where each client device is given its own key and an individually encrypted message is transmitted to all legitimate client devices, a very long transmission (the number of legitimate devices times the length of the message) is required. On the other hand, if we group legitimate devices into groups and each legitimate device is given all the keys corresponding to the group it belongs, every legitimate device needs to store a lot of keys. Motivated to create practical solutions, Fiat, et al., inv ...
@incollection{furht_broadcast_2008,
	title = {Broadcast {Encryption}},
	copyright = {©2008 Springer-Verlag},
	isbn = {978-0-387-74724-8 978-0-387-78414-4},
	url = {http://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007/978-0-387-78414-4_144},
	abstract = {DefinitionIn one-way communication system, broadcast encryption is intended to provide a means for two parties not known to each other, to communicate a cryptographic key for content protection and other applications.Broadcast encryption was first proposed by Fiat, et al., of IBM [1]. The initial goal was to allow a central broadcast site to broadcast secure transmissions to an arbitrary set of recipients while minimizing key management related transmissions. If we use a naïe approach where each client device is given its own key and an individually encrypted message is transmitted to all legitimate client devices, a very long transmission (the number of legitimate devices times the length of the message) is required. On the other hand, if we group legitimate devices into groups and each legitimate device is given all the keys corresponding to the group it belongs, every legitimate device needs to store a lot of keys. Motivated to create practical solutions, Fiat, et al., inv ...},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2016-05-03},
	booktitle = {Encyclopedia of {Multimedia}},
	publisher = {Springer US},
	editor = {Furht, Borko},
	year = {2008},
	note = {00000},
	pages = {56--56}
}
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