Motion Blurring. Furht, B., editor In Encyclopedia of Multimedia, pages 428–429. Springer US, 2008. 00000
Motion Blurring [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
SynonymsDirectional blurringDefinitionMotion blurring is a specific kind of directional blurring due to the relative motion between the camera and the scene.Imaging devices are usually not able to capture still images in an instantaneous way because image sensors collect photons for a certain period of time. Motion blur is caused by a moving scene point that spreads out several pixel locations during the sensor’s exposure. The motion blurring can be defined as global degradations caused by movements during the image capture process. As shown in Fig. 1, these movements are typically associated with the camera, long exposure times, and scene changes.Motion Blurring. Figure 1.Motion blurring examples.In general, a blurred or degraded image can be approximated as g = h*f + n, where g is the blurred image, h is the distortion operator also called the point spread function (PSF), * denotes the convolution, f is the original true image and n is the additive noise introduced ...
@incollection{furht_motion_2008,
	title = {Motion {Blurring}},
	copyright = {©2008 Springer-Verlag},
	isbn = {978-0-387-74724-8 978-0-387-78414-4},
	url = {http://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007/978-0-387-78414-4_38},
	abstract = {SynonymsDirectional blurringDefinitionMotion blurring is a specific kind of directional blurring due to the relative motion between the camera and the scene.Imaging devices are usually not able to capture still images in an instantaneous way because image sensors collect photons for a certain period of time. Motion blur is caused by a moving scene point that spreads out several pixel locations during the sensor’s exposure. The motion blurring can be defined as global degradations caused by movements during the image capture process. As shown in Fig. 1, these movements are typically associated with the camera, long exposure times, and scene changes.Motion Blurring. Figure 1.Motion blurring examples.In general, a blurred or degraded image can be approximated as g = h*f + n, where g is the blurred image, h is the distortion operator also called the point spread function (PSF), * denotes the convolution, f is the original true image and n is the additive noise introduced ...},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2016-05-03},
	booktitle = {Encyclopedia of {Multimedia}},
	publisher = {Springer US},
	editor = {Furht, Borko},
	year = {2008},
	note = {00000},
	pages = {428--429}
}
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