Motion Picture Inpainting on Aged Films. Furht, B., editor In Encyclopedia of Multimedia, pages 441–442. Springer US, 2008. 00000
Motion Picture Inpainting on Aged Films [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
DefinitionMotion picture inpainting refers to the detection of damages in video frames and repairing them.Video inpainting, as we have discussed in the article entitled “Digital Inpainting,” has a different challenge issue compared to image inpainting. Most image inpainting methods require the user to select a target area. This requirement is not possible on video due to the large number of video frames. Detection of damages in video frames is a must. Damages in video frames include spikes (usually in a bright intensity) and long vertical lines (usually in bright or dark intensity). The former is due to dust and dirt, which occurs randomly and mostly appears in one frame. The later is accidentally produced in film development and usually occurs in the same position for an unknown duration (from several frames to several minutes). Detections of the two types of damages are different problems. Both problems need to look at the damage from temporal and spatial domains. A video i ...
@incollection{furht_motion_2008-2,
	title = {Motion {Picture} {Inpainting} on {Aged} {Films}},
	copyright = {©2008 Springer-Verlag},
	isbn = {978-0-387-74724-8 978-0-387-78414-4},
	url = {http://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007/978-0-387-78414-4_117},
	abstract = {DefinitionMotion picture inpainting refers to the detection of damages in video frames and repairing them.Video inpainting, as we have discussed in the article entitled “Digital Inpainting,” has a different challenge issue compared to image inpainting. Most image inpainting methods require the user to select a target area. This requirement is not possible on video due to the large number of video frames. Detection of damages in video frames is a must. Damages in video frames include spikes (usually in a bright intensity) and long vertical lines (usually in bright or dark intensity). The former is due to dust and dirt, which occurs randomly and mostly appears in one frame. The later is accidentally produced in film development and usually occurs in the same position for an unknown duration (from several frames to several minutes). Detections of the two types of damages are different problems. Both problems need to look at the damage from temporal and spatial domains. A video i ...},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2016-05-03},
	booktitle = {Encyclopedia of {Multimedia}},
	publisher = {Springer US},
	editor = {Furht, Borko},
	year = {2008},
	note = {00000},
	pages = {441--442}
}
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