Post-occupancy Assessment of Thermal-pile and Open-well Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) System-Case Study. Garber, D. ASHRAE Transactions, 119:W1, American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers, Inc., 2013.
abstract   bibtex   
This paper presents a case study of a 1.5 MW (426 ton) capacity Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHP)system installed in the One New Change retail development in the UK. The system includes 192 thermal-piles underneath the building foundations and two open-well heat exchangers. The GSHP system was simulated using the TRNSYS energy simulation platform. A conventional borehole model based on the 'Duct Ground Heat Storage Model' was used to model the thermal-piles. The results of the model matched to within �11% of actual performance data collected from the system over a period of eight months. The borehole model can be used to simulate the performance of thermal-piles, provided that the piles are of an equal length and are spaced within a uniform grid. The results show that although the GSHP system significantly reduces energy consumption, with the current gas and electricity prices in the UK, operational costs for the GSHP system are higher than those of a conventional heating and cooling system.
@article{garber2013post,
  title={Post-occupancy Assessment of Thermal-pile and Open-well Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) System-Case Study},
  author={Garber, Denis},
  journal={ASHRAE Transactions},
  volume={119},
  pages={W1},
  year={2013},
  publisher={American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers, Inc.}
,
abstract = { This paper presents a case study of a 1.5 MW (426 ton) capacity Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHP)system installed in the One New Change retail development in the UK. The system includes 192 thermal-piles underneath the building foundations and two open-well heat exchangers. The GSHP system was simulated using the TRNSYS energy simulation platform. A conventional borehole model based on the 'Duct Ground Heat Storage Model' was used to model the thermal-piles. The results of the model matched to within �11% of actual performance data collected from the system over a period of eight months. The borehole model can be used to simulate the performance of thermal-piles, provided that the piles are of an equal length and are spaced within a uniform grid. The results show that although the GSHP system significantly reduces energy consumption, with the current gas and electricity prices in the UK, operational costs for the GSHP system are higher than those of a conventional heating and cooling system.}
}

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