Limits to Growth? – A Perspective on the Perpetual Debate. Gardner, T. Environmental Sciences, 1(2):121–138, April, 2004.
Limits to Growth? – A Perspective on the Perpetual Debate [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
The publication of the Club of Rome’s report Limits to Growth in 1972 sparked an intense and polarised debated which has remained very much alive in the subsequent three decades. The task of resolving the existence of any limits to economic growth has become the ultimate goal of much of the science and socio-political economics that address issues of sustainability. Although the advancement of technology and scientific understanding has undeniably altered the terms and parameters of the limits debate, it has also unveiled new fears, and a growing realisation of our capacity to curtail and diminish the future welfare of mankind. There is strong evidence that although we appear to have alleviated many of the earlier concerns of resource depletion, the threat of other physical limits to growth are as prevalent as they ever have been, particularly with respect to the production of waste materials. Moreover, it is increasingly likely that despite theoretical arguments which describe the potential of technology and human ingenuity, real-world complications, uncertainty and basic human aspirations will have a major role in shaping the future pattern of environmental degradation, and human welfare.
@article{gardner_limits_2004,
	title = {Limits to {Growth}? – {A} {Perspective} on the {Perpetual} {Debate}},
	volume = {1},
	issn = {1569-3430},
	shorttitle = {Limits to {Growth}?},
	url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15693430512331342592},
	doi = {10.1080/15693430512331342592},
	abstract = {The publication of the Club of Rome’s report Limits to Growth in 1972 sparked an intense and polarised debated which has remained very much alive in the subsequent three decades. The task of resolving the existence of any limits to economic growth has become the ultimate goal of much of the science and socio-political economics that address issues of sustainability. Although the advancement of technology and scientific understanding has undeniably altered the terms and parameters of the limits debate, it has also unveiled new fears, and a growing realisation of our capacity to curtail and diminish the future welfare of mankind. There is strong evidence that although we appear to have alleviated many of the earlier concerns of resource depletion, the threat of other physical limits to growth are as prevalent as they ever have been, particularly with respect to the production of waste materials. Moreover, it is increasingly likely that despite theoretical arguments which describe the potential of technology and human ingenuity, real-world complications, uncertainty and basic human aspirations will have a major role in shaping the future pattern of environmental degradation, and human welfare.},
	number = {2},
	urldate = {2015-05-25},
	journal = {Environmental Sciences},
	author = {Gardner, Toby},
	month = apr,
	year = {2004},
	keywords = {collapse, limits-to-growth},
	pages = {121--138},
	file = {Gardner - 2004 - Limits to Growth – A Perspective on the Perpetual.pdf:C\:\\Users\\rsrs\\Documents\\Zotero Database\\storage\\V5W4GBZA\\Gardner - 2004 - Limits to Growth – A Perspective on the Perpetual.pdf:application/pdf}
}
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