Does Truth Lead to Reconciliation? Testing the Causal Assumptions of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Process. Gibson, J. L. American Journal of Political Science, 48(2):201--217, 2004.
Does Truth Lead to Reconciliation? Testing the Causal Assumptions of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Process [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Throughout the world, truth commissions have been created under the assumption that getting people to understand the past will somehow contribute to reconciliation between those who were enemies under the ancien regime. In South Africa, the truth and reconciliation process is explicitly based on the hypothesis that knowledge of the past will lead to acceptance, tolerance, and reconciliation in the future. My purpose here is to test that hypothesis, based on data collected in a 2001 survey of over 3,700 South Africans. My most important finding is that those who accept the “truth” about the country's apartheid past are more likely to hold reconciled racial attitudes. Racial reconciliation also depends to a considerable degree on interracial contact, evidence that adds weight to the “contact hypothesis” investigated by western social scientists. Ultimately, these findings are hopeful for South Africa's democratic transition, since racial attitudes seem not to be intransigent.
@article{gibson_does_2004,
	title = {Does {Truth} {Lead} to {Reconciliation}? {Testing} the {Causal} {Assumptions} of the {South} {African} {Truth} and {Reconciliation} {Process}},
	volume = {48},
	issn = {1540-5907},
	shorttitle = {Does {Truth} {Lead} to {Reconciliation}?},
	url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com.proxy.lib.sfu.ca/doi/10.1111/j.0092-5853.2004.00065.x/abstract},
	doi = {10.1111/j.0092-5853.2004.00065.x},
	abstract = {Throughout the world, truth commissions have been created under the assumption that getting people to understand the past will somehow contribute to reconciliation between those who were enemies under the ancien regime. In South Africa, the truth and reconciliation process is explicitly based on the hypothesis that knowledge of the past will lead to acceptance, tolerance, and reconciliation in the future. My purpose here is to test that hypothesis, based on data collected in a 2001 survey of over 3,700 South Africans. My most important finding is that those who accept the “truth” about the country's apartheid past are more likely to hold reconciled racial attitudes. Racial reconciliation also depends to a considerable degree on interracial contact, evidence that adds weight to the “contact hypothesis” investigated by western social scientists. Ultimately, these findings are hopeful for South Africa's democratic transition, since racial attitudes seem not to be intransigent.},
	language = {en},
	number = {2},
	urldate = {2013-04-06},
	journal = {American Journal of Political Science},
	author = {Gibson, James L.},
	year = {2004},
	pages = {201--217}
}
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