Foraging ecology of Great Black-backed Gulls during brood-rearing in the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick. Gilliland, S., G., Ankney, C., D., & Hicklin, P., W. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 82(9):1416-1426, 2004.
abstract   bibtex   
We studied nesting ecology of Great Black-backed Gulls (Larus marinus L., 1758) in the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, in 1988 and 1989. We documented diet, feeding rate, and meal size for chicks from hatching to fledging. In 1989, colonies consisted of about 350 nests on five islands. Brood size declined with chick age, and by the end of the first week of the nestling period, 11%, 22%, 31%, and 36% of nests consisted of broods of 0, 1, 2, and 3 chicks, respectively. Average meals size increased and feeding frequency declined slightly with chick age. We estimated that 619.6 kg (dry mass) of food was fed to chicks during the nestling period in 1989. The composition of the chicks' diet changed with age and was most varied early in the nestling period, when they were fed relatively equal proportions of major food types. Overall, Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L., 1758) was the most important prey item and contributed 63% of the energy consumed by chicks during the nestling period. Northern krill (Meganyctiphanes norvegica (M. Sars, 1857); 11.9%), lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus L., 1758; 10.4%), and waste (fisheries and domestic; 4.7%) were also important foods. Gull chicks and Common Eider (Somateria mollissima (L., 1758)) ducklings made up 1.9% and 0.8%, respectively, of the chicks' energy budget. We conclude that the primary factor effecting productivity of the Great Black-backed Gull was food availability, and the amount of food available varied little over the nesting period in 1989.
@article{
 title = {Foraging ecology of Great Black-backed Gulls during brood-rearing in the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick},
 type = {article},
 year = {2004},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 pages = {1416-1426},
 volume = {82},
 id = {e9aa0378-e5b7-324a-a64a-21e4e39e34cb},
 created = {2020-02-12T14:39:38.792Z},
 file_attached = {true},
 profile_id = {91ad88dc-f53f-3c07-a2fb-dff94290c6c6},
 group_id = {3addd0f7-d578-34d3-be80-24022cc062a1},
 last_modified = {2020-02-12T14:39:44.821Z},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {We studied nesting ecology of Great Black-backed Gulls (Larus marinus L., 1758) in the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, in 1988 and 1989. We documented diet, feeding rate, and meal size for chicks from hatching to fledging. In 1989, colonies consisted of about 350 nests on five islands. Brood size declined with chick age, and by the end of the first week of the nestling period, 11%, 22%, 31%, and 36% of nests consisted of broods of 0, 1, 2, and 3 chicks, respectively. Average meals size increased and feeding frequency declined slightly with chick age. We estimated that 619.6 kg (dry mass) of food was fed to chicks during the nestling period in 1989. The composition of the chicks' diet changed with age and was most varied early in the nestling period, when they were fed relatively equal proportions of major food types. Overall, Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L., 1758) was the most important prey item and contributed 63% of the energy consumed by chicks during the nestling period. Northern krill (Meganyctiphanes norvegica (M. Sars, 1857); 11.9%), lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus L., 1758; 10.4%), and waste (fisheries and domestic; 4.7%) were also important foods. Gull chicks and Common Eider (Somateria mollissima (L., 1758)) ducklings made up 1.9% and 0.8%, respectively, of the chicks' energy budget. We conclude that the primary factor effecting productivity of the Great Black-backed Gull was food availability, and the amount of food available varied little over the nesting period in 1989.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Gilliland, S. G. and Ankney, C. D. and Hicklin, P. W.},
 journal = {Canadian Journal of Zoology},
 number = {9}
}
Downloads: 0