Innovations in knowledge transfer and continuity of care. Graham, I., D. & Logan, J. Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, 36(2):89-103, 2004.
Innovations in knowledge transfer and continuity of care [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
In summary, the transfer of continuity-of-care innovations to practice is a complex process. Knowledge transfer is complex in and of itself, and in the case of continuity-of-care innovations this complexity is compounded by the need to simultaneously target multiple sectors, settings, agencies, and providers. Although there are a number of knowledge transfer theories/models, their use in guiding implementation activities is not yet commonplace. If the health-care system and patients/clients are to benefit from continuity-of-care research, researchers and implementers will need to become better versed in the knowledge transfer literature, experiment with these frameworks when implementing innovations, and test their usefulness with different innovations in different contexts.
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 title = {Innovations in knowledge transfer and continuity of care},
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 year = {2004},
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 keywords = {Continuity of Patient Care,Diffusion of Innovation,Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice,Humans,Models, Nursing,clinical practice,evaluation,health care delivery,health promotion,home care,hospital care,human,model,nursing,patient care,policy,primary medical care,review,social marketing,theoretical model,theoretical study},
 pages = {89-103},
 volume = {36},
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 city = {Affiliation: School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont., Canada; Affiliation: Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Health Research Institute, CIHR; Correspondence Address: Graham, I.D.; School of Nursing, Faculty of},
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 abstract = {In summary, the transfer of continuity-of-care innovations to practice is a complex process. Knowledge transfer is complex in and of itself, and in the case of continuity-of-care innovations this complexity is compounded by the need to simultaneously target multiple sectors, settings, agencies, and providers. Although there are a number of knowledge transfer theories/models, their use in guiding implementation activities is not yet commonplace. If the health-care system and patients/clients are to benefit from continuity-of-care research, researchers and implementers will need to become better versed in the knowledge transfer literature, experiment with these frameworks when implementing innovations, and test their usefulness with different innovations in different contexts.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Graham, I D and Logan, J},
 journal = {Canadian Journal of Nursing Research},
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