The Impact of Reionization on the Stellar Populations of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies. Grebel, E., K. & Gallagher III, J., S. The Astrophysical Journal, 610(2):L89-L92, 2004.
The Impact of Reionization on the Stellar Populations of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies [pdf]Paper  The Impact of Reionization on the Stellar Populations of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Cold dark matter models for galaxy formation predict that low-mass systems will be the first sites of star formation. As these objects have shallow gravitational potential wells, the subsequent growth of their stellar populations may be halted by heating and gas loss due to reionization. This effect has been suggested to have profoundly influenced properties of present-day dwarf galaxies, including their stellar populations and even survival as visible galaxies. In this Letter we draw on results from quantitative studies of Local Group dwarf galaxy star formation histories, especially for Milky Way satellites, to show that no clear signature exists for a widespread evolutionary impact from reionization. All nearby dwarf galaxies studied in sufficient detail contain ancient populations indistinguishable in age from the oldest Galactic globular clusters. Ancient star formation activity proceeded over several Gyr, and some dwarf spheroidal galaxies even experienced fairly continuous star formation until just a few Gyr ago. Despite their uniformly low masses, their star formation histories differ considerably. The evolutionary histories of nearby dwarf galaxies appear to reflect influences from a variety of local processes rather than a dominant effect from reionization.
@article{
 title = {The Impact of Reionization on the Stellar Populations of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies},
 type = {article},
 year = {2004},
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 keywords = {Population II,Subject headings,cosmology,dwarf — galaxies,evolution — Local Group — stars,observations — early universe — galaxies},
 pages = {L89-L92},
 volume = {610},
 websites = {http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1086/423339/pdf,http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0407117},
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 abstract = {Cold dark matter models for galaxy formation predict that low-mass systems will be the first sites of star formation. As these objects have shallow gravitational potential wells, the subsequent growth of their stellar populations may be halted by heating and gas loss due to reionization. This effect has been suggested to have profoundly influenced properties of present-day dwarf galaxies, including their stellar populations and even survival as visible galaxies. In this Letter we draw on results from quantitative studies of Local Group dwarf galaxy star formation histories, especially for Milky Way satellites, to show that no clear signature exists for a widespread evolutionary impact from reionization. All nearby dwarf galaxies studied in sufficient detail contain ancient populations indistinguishable in age from the oldest Galactic globular clusters. Ancient star formation activity proceeded over several Gyr, and some dwarf spheroidal galaxies even experienced fairly continuous star formation until just a few Gyr ago. Despite their uniformly low masses, their star formation histories differ considerably. The evolutionary histories of nearby dwarf galaxies appear to reflect influences from a variety of local processes rather than a dominant effect from reionization.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Grebel, Eva K and Gallagher III, John S.},
 journal = {The Astrophysical Journal},
 number = {2}
}
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