Safer at work: development and evaluation of an aggression and violence minimization program. Grenyer, B F, Ilkiw-Lavalle, O, Biro, P, Middleby-Clements, J, Comninos, A, & Coleman, M Aust N Z J Psychiatry, 38(10):804--810, 2004.
Safer at work: development and evaluation of an aggression and violence minimization program [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Aggression and violence are recognized as significant occupational risks for health care staff. A new aggression minimization program for all public health service staff at risk in New South Wales, Australia was developed and evaluated. Twenty-two hours of training was divided into specific modules addressing: general aggression and violence minimization competencies (modules 1 and 4, 10 h); the specific needs of staff working in high-risk environments (module 2, 8 h); and a module for workplace managers and supervisors (module 3, 4 h).Two pilot samples were evaluated: (i) 15 experienced aggression trainers from across New South Wales completed and evaluated a two-day 'train the trainer' program; (ii) 48 experienced health staff completed the four training modules and assessed satisfaction, knowledge and skills acquired, attitudes toward managing aggression and confidence in dealing with aggressive incidents.Program materials were judged to be highly suitable. Staff were satisfied and increased their knowledge and skills, and evidenced improved attitudes toward working with aggressive patients. A significant increase in staff confidence for dealing with aggressive incidents was also found, with the more modules staff completed the greater their confidence in dealing with aggressive incidents.The program may contribute to helping health service industry staff attain a safer workplace.
@article{grenyer_safer_2004,
	title = {Safer at work: development and evaluation of an aggression and violence minimization program},
	volume = {38},
	url = {http://www.hubmed.org/display.cgi?uids=15369539},
	doi = {10.1111/j.1440-1614.2004.01465.x},
	abstract = {Aggression and violence are recognized as significant occupational risks for health care staff. A new aggression minimization program for all public health service staff at risk in New South Wales, Australia was developed and evaluated. Twenty-two hours of training was divided into specific modules addressing: general aggression and violence minimization competencies (modules 1 and 4, 10 h); the specific needs of staff working in high-risk environments (module 2, 8 h); and a module for workplace managers and supervisors (module 3, 4 h).Two pilot samples were evaluated: (i) 15 experienced aggression trainers from across New South Wales completed and evaluated a two-day 'train the trainer' program; (ii) 48 experienced health staff completed the four training modules and assessed satisfaction, knowledge and skills acquired, attitudes toward managing aggression and confidence in dealing with aggressive incidents.Program materials were judged to be highly suitable. Staff were satisfied and increased their knowledge and skills, and evidenced improved attitudes toward working with aggressive patients. A significant increase in staff confidence for dealing with aggressive incidents was also found, with the more modules staff completed the greater their confidence in dealing with aggressive incidents.The program may contribute to helping health service industry staff attain a safer workplace.},
	number = {10},
	journal = {Aust N Z J Psychiatry},
	author = {Grenyer, B F and Ilkiw-Lavalle, O and Biro, P and Middleby-Clements, J and Comninos, A and Coleman, M},
	year = {2004},
	pages = {804--810}
}
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