Modeling the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere of the south coast air basin of California. 1. Ozone formation metrics. Griffin, R., J., Revelle, M., K., & Dabdub, D. Environmental Science & Technology, 38(3):746-752, 2004.
Modeling the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere of the south coast air basin of California. 1. Ozone formation metrics [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Metrics associated with ozone (O-3) formation are investigated using the California Institute of Technology (CIT) three-dimensional air-quality model. Variables investigated include the 03 production rate (P(O-3)),O-3 production efficiency (OPE), and total reactivity (the sum of the reactivity of carbon monoxide (CO) and all organic gases that react with the hydroxyl radical). Calculations are spatially and temporally resolved; surface-level and vertically averaged results are shown for September 9, 1993 for three Southern California locations: Central Los Angeles, Azusa, and Riverside. Predictions indicate increasing surface-level O-3 concentrations with distance downwind, in line with observations. Surface-level and vertically averaged P(O-3) values peak during midday and are highest downwind; surface P(O-3)values are greater than vertically averaged values. Surface OPEs generally are highest downwind and peak during midday in downwind locations. In contrast, peaks occur in early morning and late afternoon in the vertically averaged case. Vertically averaged OPEs tend to be greater than those for the surface. Total reactivities are highest in upwind surface locations and peak during rush hours; vertically averaged reactivities are smaller and tend to be more uniform temporally and spatially. Total reactivity has large contributions from CO, alkanes, alkenes, aldehydes, unsubstituted monoaromatics, and secondary organics. Calculations using estimated emissions for 2010 result in decreases in P(O-3)values and reactivities but increases in OPEs.
@article{
 title = {Modeling the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere of the south coast air basin of California. 1. Ozone formation metrics},
 type = {article},
 year = {2004},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {gas-phase,nashville urban plume,nox,power-plant plumes,reactivity,regional ozone,rural site,secondary organic aerosol,simulations,southeastern united-states},
 pages = {746-752},
 volume = {38},
 websites = {<Go to ISI>://000188656000025},
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 last_modified = {2015-02-12T20:23:37.000Z},
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 source_type = {Journal Article},
 language = {English},
 notes = {<m:note>769NE<m:linebreak/>Times Cited:10<m:linebreak/>Cited References Count:33</m:note>},
 abstract = {Metrics associated with ozone (O-3) formation are investigated using the California Institute of Technology (CIT) three-dimensional air-quality model. Variables investigated include the 03 production rate (P(O-3)),O-3 production efficiency (OPE), and total reactivity (the sum of the reactivity of carbon monoxide (CO) and all organic gases that react with the hydroxyl radical). Calculations are spatially and temporally resolved; surface-level and vertically averaged results are shown for September 9, 1993 for three Southern California locations: Central Los Angeles, Azusa, and Riverside. Predictions indicate increasing surface-level O-3 concentrations with distance downwind, in line with observations. Surface-level and vertically averaged P(O-3) values peak during midday and are highest downwind; surface P(O-3)values are greater than vertically averaged values. Surface OPEs generally are highest downwind and peak during midday in downwind locations. In contrast, peaks occur in early morning and late afternoon in the vertically averaged case. Vertically averaged OPEs tend to be greater than those for the surface. Total reactivities are highest in upwind surface locations and peak during rush hours; vertically averaged reactivities are smaller and tend to be more uniform temporally and spatially. Total reactivity has large contributions from CO, alkanes, alkenes, aldehydes, unsubstituted monoaromatics, and secondary organics. Calculations using estimated emissions for 2010 result in decreases in P(O-3)values and reactivities but increases in OPEs.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Griffin, R J and Revelle, M K and Dabdub, D},
 journal = {Environmental Science & Technology},
 number = {3}
}
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