From Therapeutic Power to Resistance?: Therapy and Cultural Hegemony. Guilfoyle, M. Theory & Psychology, 15(1):101–124, February, 2005. ZSCC: 0000075
From Therapeutic Power to Resistance?: Therapy and Cultural Hegemony [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Four ideas are used to conceptually link local therapeutic practices with macro sociocultural arrangements, and to question the feasibility of therapeutically derived resistances against them: power as a productive force; the power–knowledge integration; the power–resistance relationship; and power in context. Narrative therapy is presented as an example of a ‘therapy of resistance’, which at a micro level challenges the therapist–client power relation and privileges clients’ local knowledges, and hence, at a macro level, promotes resistance against dominant discourses and practices. However, at least two fundamental problems face therapies advocating resistance. At a macro level, they are vulnerable to neutralization when they engage in broader power relations. And at a micro level, they cannot escape the institutionalized therapist–client power imbalance, which renders ethically problematic the use of the therapeutic encounter to promote resistance. Strategies for addressing these problems are discussed.
@article{guilfoyle_therapeutic_2005,
	title = {From {Therapeutic} {Power} to {Resistance}?: {Therapy} and {Cultural} {Hegemony}},
	volume = {15},
	issn = {0959-3543, 1461-7447},
	shorttitle = {From {Therapeutic} {Power} to {Resistance}?},
	url = {http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0959354305049748},
	doi = {10.1177/0959354305049748},
	abstract = {Four ideas are used to conceptually link local therapeutic practices with macro sociocultural arrangements, and to question the feasibility of therapeutically derived resistances against them: power as a productive force; the power–knowledge integration; the power–resistance relationship; and power in context. Narrative therapy is presented as an example of a ‘therapy of resistance’, which at a micro level challenges the therapist–client power relation and privileges clients’ local knowledges, and hence, at a macro level, promotes resistance against dominant discourses and practices. However, at least two fundamental problems face therapies advocating resistance. At a macro level, they are vulnerable to neutralization when they engage in broader power relations. And at a micro level, they cannot escape the institutionalized therapist–client power imbalance, which renders ethically problematic the use of the therapeutic encounter to promote resistance. Strategies for addressing these problems are discussed.},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2020-06-24},
	journal = {Theory \& Psychology},
	author = {Guilfoyle, Michael},
	month = feb,
	year = {2005},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000075},
	pages = {101--124},
}
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