Postural effects onthe perceived tilt of a line and global motion. Guterman, P. & Allison, R. S. In International Multisensory Research Forum, pages 112. 2014.
abstract   bibtex   
Aubert's (1861, Arch Pathol Anat, 20: 381-393) finding that a vertical line is perceived as tilted in tilted observers demonstrated how percepts of verticality rely on the integration of multiple sensory systems. This phenomenon has been studied extensively using static stimuli. Global motion processing may play an important role in sensory integration, so here we follow up on our earlier report (VSS 2013) and explored whether this tilt occurs when viewing global motion displays. Observers stood and lay left side down while viewing a static line and random-dot display of 2D (planar) or 3D (volumetric) global motion. For each posture and motion type, a forced-choice staircase procedure determined the tilt of the stimulus that appeared subjectively vertical (PSE). Consistent with Aubert's A-effect and our earlier results using the method of constant stimuli, shifts were significantly greater when lying on the side than standing, and in the direction of the head tilt. In the lying position, the PSE shift was significantly smaller for the global motion stimuli (95%CI: 2D = -11.49 +/- 5.86 deg., 3D = -17.08 +/- 4.77 deg.) than the line (95%CI: -23 +/- 4.76 deg.). A control experiment using single and multiple line displays eliminated eccentricity and density as potential explanations for these differences. We will discuss these findings in terms of their implications for sensory integration and mapping of spatial reference frames.
@incollection{Guterman:2014sf,
	Abstract = {Aubert's (1861, Arch Pathol Anat, 20: 381-393) finding that a vertical line is perceived as tilted in tilted observers demonstrated how percepts of verticality rely on the integration of multiple sensory systems. This phenomenon has been studied extensively using static stimuli. Global motion processing may play an important role in sensory integration, so here we follow up on our earlier report (VSS 2013) and explored whether this tilt occurs when viewing global motion displays. Observers stood and lay left side down while viewing a static line and random-dot display of 2D (planar) or 3D (volumetric) global motion. For each posture and motion type, a forced-choice staircase procedure determined the tilt of the stimulus that appeared subjectively vertical (PSE). Consistent with Aubert's A-effect and our earlier results using the method of constant stimuli, shifts were significantly greater when lying on the side than standing, and in the direction of the head tilt. In the lying position, the PSE shift was significantly smaller for the global motion stimuli (95\%CI: 2D = -11.49 +/- 5.86 deg., 3D = -17.08 +/- 4.77 deg.) than the line (95\%CI: -23 +/- 4.76 deg.). A control experiment using single and multiple line displays eliminated eccentricity and density as potential explanations for these differences. We will discuss these findings in terms of their implications for sensory integration and mapping of spatial reference frames.},
	Annote = {amsterdam june 11-15, 2014},
	Author = {Guterman, P.S. and Allison, R. S.},
	Booktitle = {International Multisensory Research Forum},
	Date-Added = {2014-08-14 17:01:35 +0000},
	Date-Modified = {2014-08-14 17:01:35 +0000},
	Keywords = {Optic flow & Self Motion (also Locomotion & Aviation)},
	Pages = {112},
	Title = {Postural effects onthe perceived tilt of a line and global motion},
	Year = {2014}}

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