Market-based environmental governance and public resources in Alberta, Canada. Hackett, R. Ecosystem Services.
Market-based environmental governance and public resources in Alberta, Canada [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Both proponents and critics of market-based conservation instruments (MBIs) have shared a tendency to characterize these new governance tools as a shift from former state centred management to a greater reliance on markets and market actors as a means of achieving conservation goals. A growing literature on the use of MBIs has outlined a series of characteristics and typologies thought to define these new environmental governance approaches. Chief among these has been the tendency to view such tools as either a displacement of state intervention in favour of private actors and free markets, or active state engagement in re-regulation in support of such ends. This paper draws on a case study of conservation offsets in response to resource development in the Canadian province of Alberta to complicate some of these pervasive narratives. Rather than representing a shift from state to market, or state intervention in support of market instruments, the provincial government has actively engaged in both limiting the development of a market-based system and shaping the parameters of existing industry-NGO offset projects in ways that avoid risks and conflict and support existing power dynamics around resource allocation and use in the province.
@article{hackett_market-based_????,
	title = {Market-based environmental governance and public resources in {Alberta}, {Canada}},
	issn = {2212-0416},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212041615000042},
	doi = {10.1016/j.ecoser.2015.01.003},
	abstract = {Both proponents and critics of market-based conservation instruments (MBIs) have shared a tendency to characterize these new governance tools as a shift from former state centred management to a greater reliance on markets and market actors as a means of achieving conservation goals. A growing literature on the use of MBIs has outlined a series of characteristics and typologies thought to define these new environmental governance approaches. Chief among these has been the tendency to view such tools as either a displacement of state intervention in favour of private actors and free markets, or active state engagement in re-regulation in support of such ends. This paper draws on a case study of conservation offsets in response to resource development in the Canadian province of Alberta to complicate some of these pervasive narratives. Rather than representing a shift from state to market, or state intervention in support of market instruments, the provincial government has actively engaged in both limiting the development of a market-based system and shaping the parameters of existing industry-NGO offset projects in ways that avoid risks and conflict and support existing power dynamics around resource allocation and use in the province.},
	urldate = {2015-02-06},
	journal = {Ecosystem Services},
	author = {Hackett, Ryan},
	keywords = {Canada, Conservation, governance, Neoliberalism, Offsets},
	file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:files/50823/Hackett - Market-based environmental governance and public r.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:files/50824/Hackett - Market-based environmental governance and public r.html:text/html}
}
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