Adapted tango improves mobility, motor-cognitive function, and gait but not cognition in older adults in independent living. Hackney, M. E., Byers, C., Butler, G., Sweeney, M., Rossbach, L., & Bozzorg, A.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy of adapted tango for improving mobility, motor-cognitive function, and gait; to determine whether former dance experience was associated with improvements; and to evaluate participant satisfaction, changes in depression, and quality of life.$\backslash$n$\backslash$nDESIGN: Quasi-experimental, two-group, repeated-measures preintervention, postintervention, and 3-month postintervention study.$\backslash$n$\backslash$nSETTING: Diverse senior independent living communities in an urban metropolitan area.$\backslash$n$\backslash$nPARTICIPANTS: Individuals aged 59 to 95 (73% aged 80 and older; 31% nonwhite, 72% female) (N = 74).$\backslash$n$\backslash$nINTERVENTION: Participants were assigned to 20 sessions of 90-minute tango (n = 62) or health education (n = 12) classes over 12 weeks.$\backslash$n$\backslash$nMEASUREMENTS: Mobility, motor-cognitive function, gait, cognition, and psychosocial function were evaluated before, immediately after, and 3 months after the intervention. Two (groups) by two (before and after) repeated-measures analyses of variance with post hoc comparisons were used to evaluate differences in primary analyses. Secondary analyses from immediately after to 3 months after were used to examine the data for retention of any gains.$\backslash$n$\backslash$nRESULTS: Forty-four tango and 10 education participants completed 20 sessions. Significant group by time interactions revealed that tango improved mobility (P = .006), backward and fast gait speeds (P < .001), and motor-cognitive function (P = .03). Education improved depression (P = .001). No relationship was noted between previous dance experience and improvements. Gains were maintained 3 months after the intervention.$\backslash$n$\backslash$nCONCLUSION: Adapted tango may improve mobility, gait and motor-cognitive function more than health education classes in older adults. Further research is necessary to confirm these findings.
@ARTICLE{Hackney2015,
  ABSTRACT = {OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy of adapted tango for improving mobility, motor-cognitive function, and gait; to determine whether former dance experience was associated with improvements; and to evaluate participant satisfaction, changes in depression, and quality of life.$\backslash$n$\backslash$nDESIGN: Quasi-experimental, two-group, repeated-measures preintervention, postintervention, and 3-month postintervention study.$\backslash$n$\backslash$nSETTING: Diverse senior independent living communities in an urban metropolitan area.$\backslash$n$\backslash$nPARTICIPANTS: Individuals aged 59 to 95 (73{\%} aged 80 and older; 31{\%} nonwhite, 72{\%} female) (N = 74).$\backslash$n$\backslash$nINTERVENTION: Participants were assigned to 20 sessions of 90-minute tango (n = 62) or health education (n = 12) classes over 12 weeks.$\backslash$n$\backslash$nMEASUREMENTS: Mobility, motor-cognitive function, gait, cognition, and psychosocial function were evaluated before, immediately after, and 3 months after the intervention. Two (groups) by two (before and after) repeated-measures analyses of variance with post hoc comparisons were used to evaluate differences in primary analyses. Secondary analyses from immediately after to 3 months after were used to examine the data for retention of any gains.$\backslash$n$\backslash$nRESULTS: Forty-four tango and 10 education participants completed 20 sessions. Significant group by time interactions revealed that tango improved mobility (P = .006), backward and fast gait speeds (P {<} .001), and motor-cognitive function (P = .03). Education improved depression (P = .001). No relationship was noted between previous dance experience and improvements. Gains were maintained 3 months after the intervention.$\backslash$n$\backslash$nCONCLUSION: Adapted tango may improve mobility, gait and motor-cognitive function more than health education classes in older adults. Further research is necessary to confirm these findings.},
  AUTHOR = {Hackney, Madeleine E. and Byers, Colleen and Butler, Gail and Sweeney, Morgan and Rossbach, Lauren and Bozzorg, Aaron},
  DATE = {2015},
  DOI = {10.1111/jgs.13650},
  ISSN = {15325415},
  JOURNALTITLE = {Journal of the American Geriatrics Society},
  KEYWORDS = {balance,cognition,exercise,mobility,older adults,tango},
  TITLE = {{Adapted tango improves mobility, motor-cognitive function, and gait but not cognition in older adults in independent living}},
}
Downloads: 0