Connecting Models, Data, and Concepts to Understand Fragmentation's Ecosystem-Wide Effects. Haddad, N. M., Holt, R. D., Jr Fletcher, R. J., Loreau, M., & Clobert, J. 40(1):1–8.
Connecting Models, Data, and Concepts to Understand Fragmentation's Ecosystem-Wide Effects [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
[Excerpt: Conclusions] The body of experimental and theoretical work that has accumulated on the problem of habitat fragmentation has slowly matured over the years, and this Special Issue highlights this growth. Yet, it also provides a springboard to the new frontiers in fragmentation research. These areas include in particular the interplay between evolutionary and metacommunity dynamics with fragments, and this interface should be the subject of inquiry that integrates theory, experiment, and observation with resources at hand. New large-scale, experimental research should be positioned to manipulate the matrix, control fragment configuration and habitat amount simultaneously, and manipulate metacommunities and metaecosystems directly, and existing experiments could be re-evaluated from this perspective. Recently created experiments foreshadow the types of opportunities that are possible. The Metatron in Moulis, France, retains unprecedented control of fragment size and connectivity, as well as abiotic conditions such as temperature and humidity (Legrand et al. 2012). The Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems in Borneo created experimental fragments within an active agricultural landscape, permitting tests of ecosystem services (Ewers et al. 2011). New and large experiments are difficult to implement, but numerous opportunities exist to integrate controlled fragmentation into restoration efforts. A new frontier in fragmentation research would be structured around a network of experiments that coordinate across different biomes and spatial scales. Taken together, our Special Issue highlights past achievements in fragmentation research, while at the same time creating a vision towards the richness of advances that are yet to come.
@article{haddadConnectingModelsData2017,
  title = {Connecting Models, Data, and Concepts to Understand Fragmentation's Ecosystem-Wide Effects},
  author = {Haddad, Nick M. and Holt, Robert D. and Jr Fletcher, Robert J. and Loreau, Michel and Clobert, Jean},
  date = {2017-01},
  journaltitle = {Ecography},
  volume = {40},
  pages = {1--8},
  issn = {0906-7590},
  doi = {10.1111/ecog.02974},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/14257192},
  abstract = {[Excerpt: Conclusions] The body of experimental and theoretical work that has accumulated on the problem of habitat fragmentation has slowly matured over the years, and this Special Issue highlights this growth. Yet, it also provides a springboard to the new frontiers in fragmentation research. These areas include in particular the interplay between evolutionary and metacommunity dynamics with fragments, and this interface should be the subject of inquiry that integrates theory, experiment, and observation with resources at hand. New large-scale, experimental research should be positioned to manipulate the matrix, control fragment configuration and habitat amount simultaneously, and manipulate metacommunities and metaecosystems directly, and existing experiments could be re-evaluated from this perspective. Recently created experiments foreshadow the types of opportunities that are possible. The Metatron in Moulis, France, retains unprecedented control of fragment size and connectivity, as well as abiotic conditions such as temperature and humidity (Legrand et al. 2012). The Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems in Borneo created experimental fragments within an active agricultural landscape, permitting tests of ecosystem services (Ewers et al. 2011). New and large experiments are difficult to implement, but numerous opportunities exist to integrate controlled fragmentation into restoration efforts. A new frontier in fragmentation research would be structured around a network of experiments that coordinate across different biomes and spatial scales. Taken together, our Special Issue highlights past achievements in fragmentation research, while at the same time creating a vision towards the richness of advances that are yet to come.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-14257192,~to-add-doi-URL,data,data-transformation-modelling,ecosystem,ecosystem-services,environmental-modelling,evolution,fragmentation,metacommunities,metaecosystems},
  number = {1}
}
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