Antioxidant-Rich Berries: Plant Food for Better Health. Haffner, K. & Remberg, S. F. 46(2):19–20.
Antioxidant-Rich Berries: Plant Food for Better Health [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
[Excerpt] The knowledge that plant-based diets reduce the risk for developing several chronic diseases (e.g. Steinmetz and Potter, 1996; Greenwald et al., 2001; Blomhoff, 2005) has led to a broad screening project of analysing plant food for total antioxidant activity by the Plant Food for Better Health Programme of Norway. Cooperating partners in this project include the Norwegian University of Life Sciences, the Norwegian Food Research Institute, and colleagues specialised on human nutrition and medicine at the University of Oslo. Special focus has been on antioxidant content in fruits, berries and vegetables. [\n] The Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP) assay was used to measure the concentration of total antioxidants. FRAP was determined in extracts by the method of Benzie and Strain (1996), with the exception that the sample was not diluted with water in the assay, as described by Halvorsen et al. (2002). A Technicon RA 1000 system (Technicon Instruments Corporation, New York, USA) was used for the measurements of absorption changes that appear when the TPTZ-Fe3+ complex is reduced to the TPTZ-Fe2+ form in the presence of antioxidants. The total antioxidant capacity was calculated as mmol 100 g-1 fresh weight. [\n] An overview of the antioxidant activity in different plant food groups (Table 1) indicates considerable variation among fruits, berries, vegetables and the other plant food groups. [\n] The antioxidant activity values for various berry and stone fruit species is presented in Table 2. Wild berries gave the highest antioxidant values, but cultivated berries are also rich sources. [...]
@article{haffnerAntioxidantrichBerriesPlant2006,
  title = {Antioxidant-Rich Berries: Plant Food for Better Health},
  author = {Haffner, K. and Remberg, S. F.},
  date = {2006},
  journaltitle = {Chronica Horticulturae},
  volume = {46},
  pages = {19--20},
  issn = {0578-039X},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/13563333____to-archive},
  abstract = {[Excerpt] The knowledge that plant-based diets reduce the risk for developing several chronic diseases (e.g. Steinmetz and Potter, 1996; Greenwald et al., 2001; Blomhoff, 2005) has led to a broad screening project of analysing plant food for total antioxidant activity by the Plant Food for Better Health Programme of Norway. Cooperating partners in this project include the Norwegian University of Life Sciences, the Norwegian Food Research Institute, and colleagues specialised on human nutrition and medicine at the University of Oslo. Special focus has been on antioxidant content in fruits, berries and vegetables.

[\textbackslash n] The Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP) assay was used to measure the concentration of total antioxidants. FRAP was determined in extracts by the method of Benzie and Strain (1996), with the exception that the sample was not diluted with water in the assay, as described by Halvorsen et al. (2002). A Technicon RA 1000 system (Technicon Instruments Corporation, New York, USA) was used for the measurements of absorption changes that appear when the TPTZ-Fe3+ complex is reduced to the TPTZ-Fe2+ form in the presence of antioxidants. The total antioxidant capacity was calculated as mmol 100 g-1 fresh weight.

[\textbackslash n] An overview of the antioxidant activity in different plant food groups (Table 1) indicates considerable variation among fruits, berries, vegetables and the other plant food groups.

[\textbackslash n] The antioxidant activity values for various berry and stone fruit species is presented in Table 2. Wild berries gave the highest antioxidant values, but cultivated berries are also rich sources. [...]},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13563333,chemical-composition,forest-resources,nutritional-composition,secondary-production},
  number = {2}
}
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