Assessing changes in extreme sea levels: Application to the English Channel, 1900–2006. Haigh, I., Nicholls, R., & Wells, N. 30(9):1042–1055. Number: 9
Assessing changes in extreme sea levels: Application to the English Channel, 1900–2006 [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
A recently extended and spatially rich English Channel sea level dataset has been used to evaluate changes in extreme still water levels throughout the 20th century. Sea level records from 18 tide gauges have been rigorously checked for errors and split into mean sea level, tidal and non-tidal components. These components and the interaction between surge and tide have been analysed separately for significant trends before determining changes in extreme sea level. Mean sea level is rising at 0.8–2.3mm/year, depending on location. There is a small increase (0.1–0.3mm/year) in the annual mean high water of astronomical tidal origin, relative to mean sea level, and an increase (0.2–0.6mm/year) in annual mean tidal range. There is considerable intra- and inter-decadal variability in surge intensity with the strongest intensity in the late 1950s. Storm surges show a statistically significant weak negative correlation to the winter North Atlantic Oscillation index throughout the Channel and a stronger significant positive correlation at the boundary with the southern North Sea. Tide–surge interactions increase eastward along the English Channel, but no significant long-term changes in the distribution of tide–surge interaction are evident. In conclusion, extreme sea levels increased at all of the 18 sites, but at rates not statistically different from that observed in mean sea level.
@article{haigh_assessing_2010,
	title = {Assessing changes in extreme sea levels: Application to the English Channel, 1900–2006},
	volume = {30},
	issn = {0278-4343},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278434310000373},
	doi = {10.1016/j.csr.2010.02.002},
	shorttitle = {Assessing changes in extreme sea levels},
	abstract = {A recently extended and spatially rich English Channel sea level dataset has been used to evaluate changes in extreme still water levels throughout the 20th century. Sea level records from 18 tide gauges have been rigorously checked for errors and split into mean sea level, tidal and non-tidal components. These components and the interaction between surge and tide have been analysed separately for significant trends before determining changes in extreme sea level. Mean sea level is rising at 0.8–2.3mm/year, depending on location. There is a small increase (0.1–0.3mm/year) in the annual mean high water of astronomical tidal origin, relative to mean sea level, and an increase (0.2–0.6mm/year) in annual mean tidal range. There is considerable intra- and inter-decadal variability in surge intensity with the strongest intensity in the late 1950s. Storm surges show a statistically significant weak negative correlation to the winter North Atlantic Oscillation index throughout the Channel and a stronger significant positive correlation at the boundary with the southern North Sea. Tide–surge interactions increase eastward along the English Channel, but no significant long-term changes in the distribution of tide–surge interaction are evident. In conclusion, extreme sea levels increased at all of the 18 sites, but at rates not statistically different from that observed in mean sea level.},
	pages = {1042--1055},
	number = {9},
	journaltitle = {Continental Shelf Research},
	shortjournal = {Continental Shelf Research},
	author = {Haigh, Ivan and Nicholls, Robert and Wells, Neil},
	urldate = {2019-04-17},
	date = {2010-05-31},
	note = {Number: 9},
	keywords = {North Atlantic Oscillation, Storm surges, English Channel, Astronomical tides, Climate changes, Extremes, Mean sea level, Northern France, Southern England}
}
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